A History of the Criminal Law of England, Band 3

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Macmillan and Company, 1883
 

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Seite 158 - ... to establish a defence on the ground of insanity, it must be clearly proved that, at the time of the committing of the act, the party accused was labouring under such a defect of reason, from disease of the mind, as not to know the nature and quality of the act he was doing; or, if he did know it, that he did not know he was doing what was wrong.
Seite 343 - That, on every such trial, the jury sworn to try the issue may give a general verdict of Guilty or Not Guilty upon the whole Matter put in issue upon such indictment or information ; and shall not be required or directed, by the court or judge before whom such indictment or information...
Seite 69 - A fugitive criminal shall not be surrendered to a foreign State unless provision is made by the law of that State, or by arrangement, that the fugitive criminal shall not, until he has been restored or had an opportunity of returning to Her Majesty's dominions, be detained or tried in that foreign State for any offence committed prior to his surrender other than the extradition crime proved by the facts on which the surrender is grounded...
Seite 225 - A conspiracy, it is said,f consists not merely in the intention of two or more, but in the agreement of two or more, to do an unlawful act or to do a lawful act by unlawful means.
Seite 300 - ... any false news or tales, whereby discord, or occasion of discord, or slander may grow between the king and his people, or the great men of the realm ; and he that doth so, shall be taken and kept in prison, until he hath brought him into the court who was the first author of the tale.
Seite 163 - To establish a defence on the ground of insanity it must be clearly proved that, at the time of committing the act, the party accused was labouring under such a defect of reason from disease of the mind, as not to know the nature and quality of the act he was doing, or if he did know it, that he did not know that what he was doing was wrong.
Seite 48 - The jurisdiction of the nation within its own territory is necessarily exclusive and absolute. It is susceptible of no limitation not imposed by itself. Any restriction upon it, deriving validity from an external source, would imply a diminution of its sovereignty to the extent of the restriction, and an investment of that sovereignty to the same extent in that power which could impose such restriction.
Seite 120 - Knowledge that the act which causes death will probably cause the death of, or grievous bodily harm to, some person, whether such person is the person actually killed or not, although such knowledge is accompanied by indifference whether death or grievous bodily harm is caused or not, or by a wish that it may not be caused.
Seite 158 - ... not, as we conceive, so accurate when put generally and in the abstract, as when put with reference to the party's knowledge of right and wrong in respect to the very act with which he is charged.
Seite 149 - No act is a crime if the person who does it is at the time when it is done prevented [either by defective mental power or] by any disease affecting his mind ' (a) From knowing the nature and quality of his act, or ' (&) From knowing that the act is wrong [or ' (c) From controlling his own conduct, unless the absence of the power of control has been produced by his own default].

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