The Oriental Herald, and Journal of General Literature, Band 9

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James Silk Buckingham
J. M. Richardson, 1826
 

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Seite 257 - Two of far nobler shape, erect and tall, Godlike erect, with native honour clad, In naked majesty seem'd lords of all, And worthy seem'd ; for in their looks divine The image of their glorious Maker shone, Truth, wisdom, sanctitude severe and pure (Severe, but in true filial freedom placed), Whence true authority in men ; though both Not equal, as their sex not equal seem'd ; For contemplation he, and valour, form'd ; For softness she, and sweet attractive grace...
Seite 552 - The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renown'd, But such as, at this day, to Indians known, In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillar'd shade, High overarch'd, and echoing walks between...
Seite 249 - O my soul, come not thou into their secret; unto their assembly, mine honour, be not thou united! For in their anger they slew a man, and in their self-will they digged down a wall. Cursed be their anger, for it was fierce, and their wrath, for it was cruel. I will divide them in Jacob and scatter them in Israel.
Seite 258 - For contemplation he and valour formed, For softness she and sweet attractive grace; He for God only, she for God in him.
Seite 552 - Thus with the year Seasons return ; but not to me returns Day, or the sweet approach of even or morn, Or sight of vernal bloom, or summer's rose, Or flocks, or herds, or human face divine ; But cloud instead, and everduring dark Surrounds me, from the cheerful ways of men Cut off, and for the book of knowledge fair Presented with a universal blank Of nature's works, to me expunged and rased, And wisdom at one entrance quite shut out.
Seite 492 - Ye horrid towers, the abode of broken hearts ; Ye dungeons, and ye cages of despair, That monarchs have supplied from age to age With music, such as suits their sovereign ears, The sighs and groans of miserable men ! There's not an English heart that would not leap To hear that ye were fallen at last; to know That e'en our enemies, so oft employ'd In forging chains for us, themselves were free. For he who values Liberty confines His zeal for her predominance within No narrow bounds ; her cause engages...
Seite 449 - As a mad man who casteth firebrands, arrows, and death, "so is the man that deceiveth his neighbour, and saith, 'Am not I in sport?
Seite 248 - The archers have sorely grieved him and shot at him and hated him. But his bow abode in strength, and the arms of his hands were made strong by the hands of the mighty God of Jacob.
Seite 176 - And be it further enacted, that the respective Courts of Judicature at Calcutta, Madras, and Bombay, shall have power from time to time to make and establish such rules with respect to the qualification, appointment, form of summoning, challenging and service of such jurors, andsuch other regulations relating thereto, as they may respectively deem expedient and proper...
Seite 215 - ... in theology may teach his follies, there can be no religion. The remedy against these evils is to punish the authors; for it is yet allowed that every society may punish, though not prevent, the publication of opinions which that society shall think pernicious. But this punishment, though it may crush the author, promotes the book ; and it seems not more reasonable to leave the right of printing unrestrained because writers may be afterwards censured, than it would be to sleep with doors unbolted...

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