The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, Band 17

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Thomas Y. Cromwell & Company, 1902
 

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Nutzerbericht  - Kaethe - LibraryThing

I'm reading the story of Pfaall. I had no idea that Poe had written science fiction about a trip to the moon. Amazing. *** Finished Pfaall, which turns out to be an amusing story, as well as ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - Kaethe - LibraryThing

I'm reading the story of Pfaall. I had no idea that Poe had written science fiction about a trip to the moon. Amazing. *** Finished Pfaall, which turns out to be an amusing story, as well as ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

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Seite 280 - During these fits of absolute unconsciousness, I drank — God only knows how often or how much. As a matter of course, my enemies referred the insanity to the drink, rather than the drink to the insanity.
Seite 190 - and " The Man that was used up " — far more than enough, you will say — but you can select to suit yourself. I would prefer having in the " Gold Bug" to the "Murders in the RM," but have not a copy just now.
Seite 219 - ... it can be true, as the children say of ghost stories. The certain thing in the tale in question is the power of the writer, and the faculty he has of making horrible improbabilities seem near and familiar.
Seite 353 - Monk Lewis once was asked how he came, in one of his acted plays, to introduce black banditti, when, in the country where the scene was laid, black people were quite unknown. His answer was : " I introduced them because I truly anticipated that blacks would have more effect on my audience than whites — and if I had taken it into my head that, by making them sky-blue the effect would have been greater, why sky-blue they should have been.
Seite 300 - You do not love me, or you would have felt too thorough a sympathy with the sensitiveness of my nature, to have so wounded me as you have done with this terrible passage of your letter : — " How often I have heard it said of you, ' He has great intellectual power, but no principle — no moral sense.
Seite 300 - By the God who reigns in Heaven, I swear to you that my soul is incapable of dishonor — that, with the exception of occasional follies and excesses which I bitterly lament but to which I have been driven by intolerable sorrow, and which are hourly committed by others without attracting any notice whatever — I can call to mind no act of my life which would bring a blush to my cheek — or to yours.
Seite 292 - lost soul " again, for your sake. I will try to overcome my grief for the sake of your unselfish care of me in the past, and in life or death, I am ever yours gratefully and devotedly, EDGAR A.
Seite 8 - ... but I will recover myself. You will not fail to see that I am suffering under a depression of spirits which will ruin me should it be long continued. Write me then and quickly; urge me to do what is right Your words will have more weight with me than the words of others, for you were my friend when no one else was. Fail not, as you value your peace of mind hereafter.
Seite 267 - I could and would have applied for aid with unbounded confidence, and with absolutely no sense of humiliation. I do not think, my dear Willis, that there is any need of my saying more. I am getting better, and may add — if it be any comfort to my enemies — that I have little fear of getting worse. The truth is, I have a great deal to do; and I have made up my mind not to die till it is done.
Seite 258 - There is a vast variety of kinds and, in degree of value, these kinds vary — but each tale is equally good of its kind. The loftiest kind is that of the highest imagination — and, for this reason only, " Ligeia

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