The Scottish Review, Band 28

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A. Gardner, 1896
 

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Seite 229 - What is a man, If his chief good and market of his time Be but to sleep and feed ? A beast, no more. Sure, He that made us with such large discourse, Looking before and after, gave us not That capability and god-like reason To fust in us unused.
Seite 191 - might do some violence to the usage of language, but I may venture to say that history without political science is a study incomplete, truncated, as on the other hand, political science without history is hollow and baseless, or in one word : ' History without political science has no fruit, Political science without history has no root.
Seite 317 - the dumb spake : and the multitudes marvelled, saying, It was never so seen in Israel. But the Pharisees said, By the prince of the devils casteth he out devils,
Seite 267 - all Cathedral churches may be put down where the service of God is grievously abused by piping with organs, singing, ringing, and trowling of psalms from one side of the choir to another, with the squeaking of chanting choristers disguised in white surplices.
Seite 404 - thirty-eight, this rider :—" That the Ministry has unwisely introduced and most unscrupulously forwarded, a measure, which threatens not only to change the form of Government, but ultimately to break up the very foundations of social order, as well as eventually to forward the views of those who are pursuing this project throughout the civilised world."
Seite 23 - Grey Hillswicke farewell ! To the calms of thy haven The storms on thy fell.' As for Foula, solitary and remote, planted like Fair Isle leagues away from the main Zetland group, it is a spot hard to get at, but wondrous worth seeing. For are there not its sites of ancient church, Picts' House, and burial mounds ; its
Seite 280 - Dancing to song is a thing of great state and pleasure. I understand it that the song be in quire, placed aloft, and accompanied with some broken music.
Seite 283 - Short Apologie of the Schoole of Abuse, 1587, we find that ' London is so full of unprofitable pipers and fiddlers that a man can no sooner enter a tavern than two or three cast of them hang at his heels to give him a dance before he depart.' These men sang ballads and catches as well.
Seite 27 - hope to include all things in my verses, not if I had a hundred tongues, a hundred mouths, and a voice of iron.' Nor does the present writer pretend to have done more than offer here a representative selection from the abundant store of interesting material that appertains to
Seite 133 - Hearken, 0 daughter, and consider, incline thine ear; Forget also thine own people, and thy father's house.

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