Courts and Lawyers of New York: A History, 1609-1925, Band 1

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The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 2005 - 1421 Seiten
This massive illustrated history of the courts and lawyers of New York from 1609-1925 contains a great deal of information that is not available elsewhere. Contents: Part I-Dutch Period: The Bases of American Law, The Dutch Legal System, The Patrons and Their Courts, Burgher Government, Dutch Magistrates. Part II-English Period: The Conflicting Land Titles, The Duke of York's Laws, The Leisler Case. Part III-American Period: Constitutional History, The Courts of Last Resort, The Supreme Court, The Court of Chancery. Part IV: Judicial Distracts and Associations of the Bar, Law Libraries and Law Schools. 59 illustrations.
 

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Inhalt

II
3
III
21
IV
31
V
37
VI
49
VII
59
VIII
63
IX
75
XXX
625
XXXI
627
XXXII
659
XXXIII
677
XXXIV
691
XXXV
711
XXXVI
729
XXXVII
745

X
89
XI
113
XII
129
XIII
153
XIV
171
XV
197
XVI
217
XVII
257
XVIII
287
XIX
289
XX
301
XXI
333
XXII
369
XXIII
385
XXIV
397
XXV
431
XXVI
453
XXVII
465
XXVIII
483
XXIX
507
XXXVIII
757
XXXIX
777
XL
789
XLI
829
XLII
867
XLIII
877
XLIV
879
XLV
891
XLVI
931
XLVII
977
XLVIII
1089
XLIX
1131
L
1165
LI
1213
LII
1253
LIII
1297
LIV
1323
LV
1343
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Seite 64 - That the liberties, franchises, privileges, and jurisdictions of Parliament are the ancient and undoubted birthright and inheritance of the subjects of England...
Seite 17 - ... and that your Majesty would also vouchsafe to declare, that the awards, doings, and proceedings to the prejudice of your people, in any of the premises, shall not be drawn hereafter into consequence or example : and that your Majesty would be also graciously pleased, for the further comfort and safety of your people, to declare your royal will and pleasure, that in the things aforesaid all your officers and ministers shall serve you, according to the laws and statutes of this realm, as they tender...
Seite 17 - Majesty would be pleased to remove the said soldiers and mariners and that your people may not be so burdened in time to come. And that the aforesaid commissions for proceeding by martial law may be revoked and annulled. And that hereafter no commissions of like nature may issue forth to any person or persons whatsoever to be executed as aforesaid, lest by colour of them any of your Majesty's subjects be destroyed or put to death contrary to the laws and franchise of the land.
Seite 17 - All which they most humbly pray of your most excellent Majesty as their rights and liberties, according to the laws and statutes of this realm; and that your Majesty would also vouchsafe to declare that the awards, doings, and proceedings, to the prejudice of your people in any of the premises, shall not be drawn hereafter into consequence or example...
Seite 114 - He declared it to be treason to " petition against one's magistrates, whether there be cause or not ;" and he defended Kieft's conduct in rejecting the interference of the Twelve, saying: " If any one during my administration shall appeal, I will make him a foot shorter, and send the pieces to Holland, and let him appeal in that way.
Seite 16 - Majesty, that no man hereafter be compelled to make or yield any gift, loan, benevolence, tax, or such like charge, without common consent by act of parliament...

Über den Autor (2005)

Alden Chester [1848-1934] graduated from Columbia University Law School in 1871 and was admitted to the New York Bar in 1871. He practiced in Albany until 1895, when he was elected to the Third Judicial District Supreme Court. He was designated to the Appellate Division by Gov. Odell and served from 1902 to 1909. Chester returned to the trial bench at the behest of Gov. Hughes to help clear an unusual backlog of cases, and retired from the bench in 1918. Justice Chester served as deputy clerk of the New York State Assembly from 1874 to 1876; as a member of the Board of Public Instruction of Albany from 1881 to 1884 (and as its president in 1884); as an assistant United States Attorney for the Northern District of New York from 1882 to 1885; and as an assistant corporation counsel of the City of Albany from 1894 to 1895. He also served as president of the Albany Medical College, a trustee of the Albany College of Pharmacy, a governor of Union University, and a special lecturer on the Federal judicial system at Albany Law School. He was president of the American Bar Association in 1919. Justice Chester was also the author of The Legal and Judicial History of New York (1911).

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