Good Manners: A Manual of Etiquette in Good Society

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Porter & Coates, 1870 - 246 Seiten
 

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Seite 188 - SINCERITY Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly; and, if you speak, speak accordingly.
Seite 6 - Atrides would have felt a bent rose-leaf, yet subdue its feeling in glow of battle, and behave itself like iron. I do not mean to call an elephant a vulgar animal ; but if you think about him carefully, you will find that his non-vulgarity consists in such gentleness as is possible to elephantine nature — not in his insensitive hide, nor in his clumsy foot, but in the way he will lift his foot if a child lies in his way ; and in his sensitive trunk, and still more sensitive mind, and capability...
Seite 10 - When we reflect on their persuasive and cheering force; how they recommend, prepare, and draw people together; how, in all clubs, manners make the members; how manners make the fortune of the ambitious youth; that, for the most part, his manners marry him, and, for the most part, he marries manners; when we think what keys they are, and to what secrets; what high lessons and inspiring tokens of character they convey; and what divination is required in us, for the reading of this fine telegraph, we...
Seite 223 - Great merit, or great failings, will make you respected or despised; but trifles, little attentions, mere nothings, either done, or neglected, will make you either liked or disliked, in the general run of the world.
Seite 224 - ... at supper, for he is always joking and laughing ; we will ask another, because he plays deep at all games, or because he can drink a great deal. These are all vilifying distinctions, mortifying preferences, and exclude all ideas of esteem and regard. Whoever is had (as it 'is called) in company for the sake of any one thing singly, is singly that thing, and will never be considered in any other light ; consequently never respected, let his merits be what they will.
Seite 227 - In mixed companies, whoever is admitted to make part of them, is, for the time at least, supposed to be upon a footing of equality with the rest ; and consequently, as there is no one principal object of awe and respect, people are apt to take a greater latitude in their behaviour, and to be less upon their guard; and so they may, provided it be within certain bounds, which are upon no occasion to be transgressed.
Seite 183 - Let your conversation be without malice or envy, for it is a sign of a tractable and commendable nature, and in all causes of passion admit reason to govern.
Seite 225 - ... meant at him ; if the company happens to laugh, he is persuaded they laugh at him ; he grows angry and testy, says something very impertinent, and draws himself into a scrape, by showing what he calls a proper spirit, and asserting himself.
Seite 232 - Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable ; however, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer it, than those whose laziness and despondency make them give it up as unattainable.
Seite 209 - ... and a good heart desires rather to conceal than expose other people's weaknesses or misfortunes. If you have wit, use it to please, and not to hurt : you may shine like the sun in the temperate zones, without scorching.

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