“The” Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets: With Critical Observations on Their Works, Band 3

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G. Walker, J. Akerman, E. Edwards, 1821
 

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Seite 171 - If the flights of Dryden, therefore, are higher, Pope continues longer on the wing. If of Dryden's fire the blaze is brighter, of Pope's the heat is more regular and constant. Dryden often surpasses expectation, and Pope never falls below it. Dryden is read with frequent astonishment, and Pope with perpetual delight.
Seite 214 - THIS modest stone, what few vain marbles can, May truly say, * Here lies an honest man :' A poet, bless'd beyond the poet's fate, Whom Heaven kept sacred from the proud and great Foe to loud praise, and friend to learned ease, Content with science in the vale of peace.
Seite 134 - Who but must laugh if such a man there be ? Who would not weep if Atticus were he?
Seite 172 - Hill, with some attention to Waller's poem on The Park ; but Pope cannot be denied to excel his masters in variety and elegance, and the art of interchanging description, narrative, and morality. The objection made by Dennis is the want of plan, of a regular subordination of parts terminating in the principal and original design. There is this want in most descriptive poems, because as the scenes, which they must exhibit successively, are .all subsisting at the same time, the order in which they...
Seite 370 - Perhaps he was the most learned man in Europe. He was equally acquainted with the elegant and profound parts of science, and that not superficially, but thoroughly. He knew every branch of history, both natural and civil ; had read all the original historians of England, France, and Italy ; and was a great antiquarian. Criticism, metaphysics, morals, politics, made a principal part of his study ; voyages and travels of all sorts were his favourite amusements ; and he had a fine taste in painting,...
Seite 133 - Arbuthnot was a man of great comprehension, skilful in his profession, versed in the sciences, acquainted with ancient literature, and able to animate his mass of knowledge by a bright and active imagination ; a scholar with great brilliance of wit; a wit, who, in the crowd of life, retained and discovered a noble ardour of religious zeal.
Seite 132 - This mode of imitation, in which the ancients are familiarised, by adapting their sentiments to modern topicks, by making Horace say of Shakespeare what he originally said of Ennius, and accommodating his satires on Pantolabus and Nomentanus to the flatterers and prodigals of our own time, was first practised in the reign of Charles the Second by Oldham and Rochester, at least I remember no instances more ancient. It is a kind of middle composition between translation and original design, which pleases...
Seite 168 - He wrote, as he tells us, with very little consideration ; when occasion or necessity called upon him, he poured out what the present moment happened to supply, and when once it had passed the press, ejected it from his mind ; for when he had no pecuniary interest, he had no further solicitude.
Seite 52 - Bathos," as a proficient in the "Art of Sinking; and in his enumeration of the different kinds of poets distinguished for the profound, he reckons Broome " among the Parrots who repeat another's words " in such a hoarse odd tone as makes them seem

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