The Works of Samuel Johnson: LL.D. A New Edition in Twelve Volumes. With an Essay on His Life and Genius, by Arthur Murphy, Esq, Band 8

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F. C. and J. Rivington, 1823
 

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Seite 286 - As — she may not be fond to resign. 1 have found out a gift for my fair, I have found where the wood-pigeons breed ; But let me that plunder forbear : She will say 'twas a barbarous deed.
Seite 194 - Pope had, in proportions very nicely adjusted to each other, all the qualities that constitute genius. He had Invention, by which new trains of events are formed, and new scenes of imagery displayed, as in ' The Rape of the Lock;' and by which extrinsic and adventitious embellishments and illustrations are connected with a known subject, as in the
Seite 87 - Thetis' son he bends his care, And plunge the Greeks in all the woes of war. Then bids an empty phantom rise to sight, And thus commands the vision of the night : • . directs Fly hence, delusive dream, and, light as air, To Agamemnon's royal tent repair ; Bid him in arms draw forth th' embattled train, March all his legions to the dusty plain.
Seite 243 - Here he had .the privilege of a country recess, the fragrant bower, the spreading lawn, the flowery garden, and other advantages, to soothe his mind and aid his restoration to health; to yield him, whenever he chose them, most grateful intervals from his laborious studies, and enable him to return to them with redoubled vigour and delight.
Seite 376 - His supplication to father Thames, to tell him who drives the hoop or tosses the ball, is useless and puerile. Father Thames/ has no better means of knowing than himself.
Seite 133 - Arbuthnot was a man of great comprehension, skilful in his profession, versed in the sciences, acquainted with ancient literature, and able to animate his mass of knowledge by a bright and active imagination ; a scholar with great brilliancy of wit ; a wit, who, in the crowd of life, retained and discovered a noble ardour of religious zeal.
Seite 371 - He knew every branch of history, both natural and civil : had read all the original historians of England, France, and Italy ; and was a great antiquarian. Criticism, metaphysics, morals, politics, made a principal part of his study ; voyages and travels of all sorts were his favourite amusements ; and he had a fine taste in painting, prints, architecture, and gardening.
Seite 213 - Heaven kept sacred from the Proud and Great: Foe to loud praise, and friend to learned ease, Content with science in the vale of peace.
Seite 238 - The great defect of the Seasons is want of method ; but for this I know not that there was any remedy. Of many appearances subsisting all at once, no rule can be given why one should be mentioned before another ; yet the memory wants the help of order, and the curiosity is not excited by suspense or expectation. His diction is in the highest degree florid and luxuriant, such as may be said to be to his images and thoughts both their lustre and their shade; such as invests them with splendour, through...
Seite 208 - Here rests a woman, good without pretence, Blest with plain reason, and with sober sense: No conquest she, but o'er herself, desir'd ; No arts essay'd, but not to be admir'd. Passion and pride were to her soul unknown, Convinced that Virtue only is our own. So unaffected, so composed a mind, So firm, yet so'ft, so strong, yet so refined, Heaven, as its purest gold, by tortures try'd ; The saint sustained it, but the woman dy'd.

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