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Columbus, who boldly dashed through unknown seas in vessels of no greater burthen.”

“ It seemeth to me, that for a daring spirit, the mariners of England bear the palm from all others," remarked the secretary.

" That do they, whether in the fight or in quest of adventure," replied Raleigh.

66 The consideration of this hath put me upon the writing of a ballad,” said Master Francis.

66 'Tis a stirring subject, and I should like to hear what you have made of it," added his patron. Upon this his young companion gave a paper out of his vest (with some modest apologies for its imperfectness), the which Sir Walter opening, did read aloud, as followeth :

152 heh the p

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“ Old Neptune rules no more the ever rolling seas,

And from their ozier beds have fled the Oceanides;
And despots of the earth that sought to sway the waves,
Though they, like Xerxes, flung them chains, could never make

them slaves.
The mem'ry of the ark hath vanished from them now,
And unesteemed the Bucentaur may bare her golden prow;
Whilst fearfully to port the Argosie must flee,
For the Mariners of England are lords of all the sea !

" A voice that pierced the world was shouted from the isles,

Where Phoebus in his glory, o'er a land of freemen, smiles;
The Adriatic heard, and started at the sound,
The billows of the Bosphorus made each a loftier bound;
Far o'er th’ Atlantic waste that voice in thunder roars,
And now the vast Pacific sends its echoes from her shores;
And every Ocean deep cried out, 'Come bow the knee,
For the Mariners of England are lords of all the sea !'

“ No more shall England's foes her island throne put down, Since Hawkins, Frobisher, and Drake, have proved she wears

the crown;
No more Armadas now will come to work her shame,
Since Howard made th' Invincible' to wear a meaner narge;
Nor shall her gallant ships fear all the power of Spain,
Since they have spoiled the Spanish coast and swept the Spanish

Main;
And dread of foreign rule in England shall not be,
For the Mariners of England are lords of all the sea !”

What Sir Walter Raleigh might have said upon the ballad know I not, for just as he had finished the perusing of it, there came the master of the ship to him on pressing business, and returning the paper to Master Francis, he did give up his attention entirely to the other.

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Aspasia. He has a cozening face
You meant him for a man?

Ant. He was so, madam.

Asp. Why then 'tis well enough. Never look back,
You have a full wind and a false heart, Theseus.
Does not the story say his keel was split,
Or his masts spent, or some kind rock or other
Met with his vessel ?

Ant. Not as I remember.
Asp. It should have been so.

BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER.

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l'll drown more sailors than the mermaid shall;
I'll slay more gazers than the basilisk ;
I'll play the orator as well as Nestor ;
Deceive more slyly than Ulysses could :
And send the wondrous Machiavel to school.

SHAKSPEARE.

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AFTER staying of several days at Teneriffe without being joined by any of his ships, Sir Walter Raleigh proceeded on his way to Trinidad, and cast anchor at a Spanish settlement called of the colonists Puerto de los Españoles, where, to his great joy he found a part of his squadron. From the bay the town had a very goodly aspect, being of some size. The houses were principally those of the natives, and were built of wood very pleasant

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to look upon, with trees growing among them in great abundance, lofty, and of a marvellous verdure. Some buildings there were of the Spanirds of a more stately sort; and the country rou: ! about seemed exceedingly inviting, stretching her and there into green pastures, with much diversity of rock, and wood, and mountain. Of natives they saw a vast number, but they were at a great distance, and came not any nigher; but at the landingplace there was seen a company of Spaniards drawn up as if keeping guard, whereof were some stately fellows in long high-crowned hats with feathers in them, carrying of famous long pieces: seeing of the strength of those in the ships, they prudently gave

them no molestation. Indeed some of them presently got into boats and came on board, and Sir Walter had them treated very courteously; went amongst them himself, giving of them a plenty of wine and good cheer, of the which having been without a long time, it made them exceeding merry in a small space, and he talked to them in their own language enquiringly of Guiana–of the riches thereof-and of the bays and passages that were most practicable; making it appear all the while that he cared not for the going there, being bound for the English colony he had planted in Virginia; and the simple soldiers, charmed with his courtesy, not only told him all they knew, but all they had heard of, one eagerly interrupting of

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the other in some alluring narration of the wondrous riches of the place.'

It did look exceeding picturesque to see those Spaniards grouped about on the deck, some a sitting where they could; one or two lying of their length, resting of themselves upon their elbows; and the rest lolling wherever they might find a conveniency; their Spanish habits looking soiled. and worn; their faces swarthy, with peaked beards, long mustachios, piercing eyes, and curly hair, all very black; every man armed, yet passing of the wine-cup from one to another with as cheerful a spirit as if such a thing as strife was gone clean out of their hearts; and Sir Walter standing amongst themwhose princely figure and noble countenance as much won their admiration as did the liberality of his spirit as evinced in his treatment of them-doing of every courtesy that could make them feel at their ease, the whilst he was dexterously intent upon the getting of such information as might be serviceable to him in his hoped for conquest of Guiana. Close unto his elbow stood Master Francis, apparently somewhat interested at what was going forward, for he understood the language pretty well, and he was describing to two or three of the officers what was said. There was a strong guard of soldiers posted about the ship for fear of any sudden treachery, and the mariners were looking on from different places about the deck and up

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