The Historical Works of Sir James Balfour: Published from the Original Manuscripts Preserved in the Library of the Faculty of Advocates, Band 2

Cover
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 108 - ... his presence, in so much as maney for shame have left the roome, as being out of countenance. His beard was werey thin ; his toung too large for his mouthe, and made him drinke werey vncomlie, as if eatting his drinke, wich cam out into the cupe in each syde of his mouthe. His skin vas als softe as tafta sarsnet, wich felt so because he neuer washt his hands, onlie rubb'd his fingers ends slightly vith the vett end of a napkin.
Seite 108 - ... ends slightly vith the vett end of a napkin. His legs wer verey weake ; having had, as was thought, some foule play in his youthe ; or rather, belor he was borne ; that he was not able to stand at seuin zeires of age ; that weaknes made him euer leaning on other men's shoulders.
Seite 108 - His eyes large, euer roulling after aney "stranger cam in his presence, in so much as maney for " shame have left the roome, as being out of countenance. His '• beard was werey thin ; his toung too large for his mouthe, and '* made him drinke werey vncomlie, as if eatting his drinke, wich " cam out into the cupe in eache syde of his mouthe.
Seite 108 - He was of a middle stature, more corpulent throghe his clothes than in his bodey, zet fatt enouch : his clothes euer being made large and easie, the doubletts quilted for steletto proofe, his breeches in grate pleits, and full stuffed. He was naturally of a timorous dispositione, which was the gratest reasone of his quilted doubletts. His eyes large, euer roulling after...
Seite 110 - Apparrell so constant, as by his good wil he would never change his cloathes untill worn out to very ragges : His Fashion never: Insomuch as one bringing to him a Hat of a Spanish Block, he cast it from him, swearing he neither loved them nor their fashions.
Seite 114 - ... pretty flashes of valour which might easily be discerned to be forced, not naturall; and being forced, could have wished, rather, it would have recoiled backe into himselfe, then carryed to that King it had concerned, least he might have been put to the tryall, to maintaine his seeming valour. In a word, he was (take him altogether and not in peeces) such a King, I wish this Kingdom have never any worse, on the condition, not any better; for he lived in peace, dyed in peace, and left all his...
Seite 381 - Generall, and with him a thousand fbotte ; hot quhen he cam to Aberdeine, he was recruited with ane addition of 500 footte more, and tuo troupes of horsse, commandit by Capitane Forbesse. His first exployt was the apprehend of 26 citicens of Aberdeine, that wold not subscriue the couenant ; thesse he sent prissoners to Edinbrughe, wnder a gaurde, quher they wer all shutte wpe in closse prissone ; then took.- he the housse of Drum, and sent the Laird therof, and his brother Robert, bothe prissoners...
Seite 108 - THIS Kings Character is much easier to take then his Picture, for he could never be brought to sit for the taking of that, which is the reason of so few good peeces of him; but his Character was obvious to every eye. He was of a middle stature, more corpulent through his cloathes...
Seite 427 - In February, this zeire, also, deyed William, Earle of Streueling, Viscount Canada, Lord Alexander, Principall Secretarey for Scotland to King Charles the First, at London. Hes bodey wes enbalmed, and by sea transported to Streweling, and ther priuatly interrid by night in Bowies lyle, in Strewelinge churche, the 12 of Apryle, 1640.
Seite 220 - ... otherwise than inimical ; and Balfour, in his Annals, does not spare him, as the following passage shows. * " In the beginning of Aguste, this zeire, (1634) a warrant was procured from the King, by the Earl of Traquaire, quho had laitly fallin oute with the Lord Chanceler, [Archbishop Spottiswood,] for procuring the marriage of one Inglis, with a good portione, to one Butter, a nephew of his ; wich Morsell Traquair had formerlie, in his conceit, deuored for a cousin of his auen, with quhome he...

Bibliografische Informationen