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Meteorological Diaries for Auguft and September, 1791. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE for September, 1791. Height of Fahrenheit's Thermometer.

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Height of Fahrenheit's Thermometer,

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Month.

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55 29,93 fhowery

Sept.
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51

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74

58

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53

997 cloudy

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29 fair

54

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57

68

51

15 fair

66

30,11 fair

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60 29,85 rain

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47 29,72 fhowery

43 30,04 fair

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61

69

57 30,02 thowery

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55 13 fair

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Barom. Therm

State of Weather in August 1791.

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fettled rain all day without intermiffion, fome thunder about noon, fome fleet with the rain in the afternoon 6. Summer fallows very clean, the ground drawing into ridges.-7. Evaporation has been inconfiderable the week preceding. Toad flax (linoria) in bloom. Furz (relex) in bloom for the fecond time. Circular webs hanging upon the bushes. Measured a plant of the lucerne (medica), a few growing promifcuoufly in a meadow, and cut along with the other grafs, me 18, and at this time in bloom, measured 30 inches from the ground to the top of the plant. N.B. Fifty days growth.-8. Early oats reaping.-9. A kind of glory or radi appeared round the moon, about 3 circumference, about ten o'clock at night, for a few minutes, clear exp infe, but few ftars.-11. A number of white butterflies amongst cabbages and other Redbreaft fings its autumnal fong.-15. Con ripens faft, green, depofiting their eggs. wheat and oats cut. Thunder in the evening, and violent flathes of hightning.-16. A tiemendous clap of thunder about 13 hunutes after five in the morning, heard nearly at the fame ime at 20 miles diftance Land W; lightning and thunder continued.-18. Sky red at fun

THE

6787

Gentleman's Magazine:

For SEPTEMBER,

1791.

BEING THE THIRD NUMBER OF VOL. LXI. PART II.

Mr. URBAN, Hereford, Sept. 25. XXX HE old mantion of Burgbope, or Burbope, of which I lately fent you Ta drawing, is fituated near the road from Hereford to Leominster, feven miles from the former, on an agreeable eminence, a part of Dinmore hill. It was for fome ages in the family of the Moores; and from them came to the antient family of Goodere, which has often enjoyed the honour of knighthood, and been of confiderable note in feveral counties'.

Francis G. of London, who lived in the reign of Henry VIII, purchafed Polefworth nunnery at the Diffolution, and had iffue William and Heary, both knights; Sir Henry an accomplished perfon, and of eminent note in that County, fuffered imprifonment in bchalf of the unfortunate Queen of Scots2. He left two daughters; Frances married to Sir Henry, his eldest brother's fon and heir 3, whofe iue were four daughters 4. Henry G. was living at Baginton 10 Eliz.s From this family defcended Edward G. efq. created baronet Dec. 5, 1707, 6 Anne; knight of the fe for the county of Hereford in the parliament preceding that, and M. P. for Evesham in feveral fince; 80 years old 1727, and died 1739, aged 92, having married Eleanor, only daughter and heir of Sir Edward Dineley, knt. of Charlton, in the county of Worcester, by Frances, daughter of Lewis Watfon, Lord Rocking

ham. He was the last of the family who refided here; but the property devolved to his eldest fon, Sir John Dineley Gooders, who affumed the name of Dineley inrefpe&t of the large eftate which he inherited from his mother; but, having lived on b:d terms with his younger brother, Samuel Dineley G. captain of the Ruby man of war, and threatening to difiaherit him in favour of his fifter's fon, John Foot, of Truro, in Cornwall, efq. it fo alarmed the Captain, that he formed a resolution of murthering him, which he executed Jan. 17, 1741. A friend at Brifol, who knew their mortal antipathy, had invited them both to dine, in hopes of reconciling them, and they parted in the evening in feeming friendship; but the Captain placed fome of his men in the fireet, near College-green, to carry off his brother, under pretence of his being difordered in his fenfes, to his fhip, where he cauled him to be ftrangled in the cabin by two of the crew, White and Mahony, himfelf standing at the door. Such an atrocous deed could not long be concealed": the Captain and his two accomplices were tried at Briftol the 28th of March following, and executed April 15. He had behaved bravely in his profeffion on feveral occafions, been at the taking of St. Sebaftian, Feriol, and St. Antonio. His eldett fon, Etward, fucceeded to the title, and dying 1761, fiagle, was fucceeded by his brother John, who died at Dublin, 17857. John Foot, nephew to Sir John, and elder brother to the celebrated comedian. became poffelfed of the Charis o

The four lines in p. 793 (m which for “WALKER” Tead “WATHEN”) were printed off before this particular defcription of Bughope and its owners was received. EDIT. 2 Camden's Annals of Queen Elizabeth, 1571-1573. 3 The other filler, Anne, married Henry Rainsford, of Clifford, in the county of Gloucefter. Dugd. 4 Dugdale's Warwickshire, 1113, 114, ed. Thomas. See vol. XI. pp. 150, 163, 218. 7 See vol. 1.V. p. 1005, where he is by mistake called the fecond baronet of the family, being really the fourib.

5 Baronetage.

fet.-19. Great dew this morning, and the firft of any confequence of all this fummer.20. Dow again.-22 Corn houfed Paftures bare. No after-grats this featon. Want of grafs general. Flies very numerous and troublesome.-25. Damage done amongst corn with the wind of last night. Corn harveft general. Vaft quantities of mushrooms gathered: 1778 a fimilar crop; and in the year 1761 there was also a very abundant crop of fpontaneous. mushrooms.-29. Springs begin to fall -31. Began to rain foon after fix o'clock this moining, and held without ceafing till between five and fix the fucceeding morning. Fall of train during this nearly two inches. Total fall of ram this mouth, 5 inches 3-cths. Evaporation, 3 inches.

788 Epitaph on Mr. Salter.-Extracts from Baker's Letters. [Sept.

eftate, and fold it to Sir John's widow's fecond husband, Mr. Rayner, printer, in Whitefriars, who fold it again 8.

Soon after the fatal catastrophe happened to the brothers, Burghope, with other eftates, to the amount of 1000l. a year, were purchafed by Governor Feachy, now Sir Janies Peachy, bart. The house and gardens have been fo much neglected, that the former ferves only as a warehoufe or granary to the farmer, and the gardens are chiefly planted with hops. This. houfe muft have been a moft defirable refidence, having fpacious woods, whence the views were extentive and picturefque. It had a very defirable neighbourhood, having Hampton-court, Dinmore, and Winfty, near it. J. WATHEN.

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excellent modern-built parfonage-house, finely fituated on a rifing ground, with a delightful profpect, about a quarter of a mile North from the church. He bore an excellent character in his neighbourhood, which I cannot quit without expreffing my fatisfaction in the arrangement of the adjoining parish of Bartlow, in Cambridgeshire. Mr. Hall, who is rector in his own right, and an active magistrate, has inffituted a Sunday.. fchool, of which his clerk and gardener is the mafler, and himself and Mrs. H. jointly aflift him. The parfonage ftands on the South fide of the church, and Mr. H. has improved the flope of the hill as a pleafant garden and lawn, and covered the South tide of the church with Aourishing fruit-trees. The church with its round tower prefents a picturesque appearance; and a few poles diftance to the South are the five fepulchral hills, fuppofed of Danish origin, of a conical form, and different heights, and four of them planted at top with clumps of trees. Yours, &c. R. G.

Mr URBAN,

Sept. 9. To your extract from Mr. Baker's

Letters refpecting Bishop Burnet, P. 725, add, "To Bifhop Burnet I have no more to fay than that, instead of compliances, I gave him the highest provocation, fuch as most men would have highly refented, but few befides himfelf would have printed. But my principle is not fo high as you may ima gine. I hold communion with the Eftablished Church: the new communion I do not understand."

"No man ever had more enemies, or has been more defpitefully treated. I with you could find time to read his Life, written by his fon, which has given me more entertainment than his hiftory."

In another letter Mr. Baker fays,"Mr. Carte's work meets with fome delay from his infirmities, having been much difabled of late by a rheumatism; but is now pretty well recovered. I am been Dean of Windfor if he could have told by a good hand that he might have accepted. You know he is in orders though he appears in a lay habit." May

26, 1734.

"It Mr. Th. (qu. Theohalt, whom in a former letter he celebrates as a

fcholar, in his Preface to Shaklpeare, and fays, he had a very able tchoolmatter in Mr. Ellis of your university, and fome while of ours, under whom he

Was

was well grounded,) intends an edition of Æfchylus; no doubt he will know the ufe of Dr. Needham's papers, which, if I remember right, were bequeathed to Dr. Mead."

In another letter, he fays, "Dr. Needham's Efchylus goes on flowly. I have heard nothing of it lately, nor of Mr. Stanley's fon being an author or tranflator."

Among Bishop Tanner's MSS. at Oxford, No. 418, is the trial of the Lord Macguire: the beginning wanting. Was this the Lord who was ap prehended in Ireland for rebellion 1642? Yours, &c. D. H.

Mr. URBAN, Sept. 10. ON N the authority of actual infpection, with a friend who would not be imposed on in fuch matters, I take upon me to defend the reading of the Southwell infcription, given in the new edition of Camden, II. 290; and by your correfpondent, LX. 699, 795, though pointed differently from both. It is on the pillar Exulis, and followed by a colon, whereby it is infeparably connected with fan&is, and made a dative plural, inftead of your correfpondent's genitive fingular. On what authority Gervafe Lee, the writer or compofer of this infcription, preferred exulis to exulibus, let grammarians decide.

The paffage ftands thus:

Det Deus boc fan&tum fanétis fit femper afylum

Exulis: idolatras facrilegosque ruat. The meaning is more obvious than the Latinity is correct.

na

Against the front of the George inn at Northampton is this infcription white marble tablet, lately renewed: JOHANNES DRYDEN, ar. Afhbeia Canonicorum

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Mr. URBAN, Bishop's Auckland, Sept.' FEW week ago the following letter of Mifs Talbot's came by acc.. dent into my hands *. On account of its excellence, I fend it for infertion. T. S. " June 10, 1747.

I

"A twelvemonth ago, dear Mr. left a letter and a parcel for you; for who thought of your running away into Ireland? At length I hear you are returning; but, as I fuppofe your wandering ftars will not lead you towards Oxfordshire, and our kind planets will probably keep us there feveral months, there is no likelihood of our meeting till after Christmas. I muft, therefore, leave you fome explanation of my parcel.In the first place, 1 muft remind you of confiderably in your debt. what I dare fay you have forgot, that I am

"It may be neceffary too, perhaps, to put you in mind that, when laft I faw you, you were mightily engaged in forming a pyramid of books, the bafis of which, you told me, was feveral volumes of Philofophy. You must know there is another fort of books which I think a much better foundation of fuch a building; and, not having heard you mention Sermons, I have fent you a fet of Archbishop Sharpe's, who is one of my fabut to me the fcience of the heart is often vourites. It may be a ftupid fort of talte; more engaging than that of the head; at leaft, when one is in bad fpirits (as I know you are too often), there is nothing that to eafily leads one back to chearfulness as a plan, good-humoured Sermon. It not only turns off one's mind from whatever is at prefent uneafy to it, but it gives one the moft rational grounds for happiness. To read fuch a book, is to talk with an agreeable friend of the most interesting fubjects. If you are for more fublime fpeculations, more elegance of thought and language, Mr. Addifon's little book is as charming a companion as I know for a morning's or an evening's walk.

"Adieu- with you all happiness; and hope, when I come to town, I fhall find you fettled again in a good deal of bufinets, very attentive to it, and free from all melancholy reveries.

"Had I been a fine, ingenious lady, I might have fent you a pretty motto-ring, or fome genteel remembrance; but, fuch as I am, do not laugh at me; and believe me to he, very uncerely, your much obliged and faithful humble fervant, C. TALBOT."

*The volume T. S. enquires after will very probably appear next winter. EDIT.

Mr.

790 Epitaphs on the Bournes at Afhover.-Literary Enquiries. [Sept.

Mr. URBAN,

July 3. SEND you a copy of the monumental infcription in Afhover church, on the widow of Immanuel Bourne, rector and patron of that place. Her husband was buried at Ailefton, in Leicestershire, as mentioned in Mr. Nichols's "Collections" for that county, p. 543; and therefore has no monument in Afhover church. Several of his defcendants are buried at Afhover *; and the Rev. Law

rence Bourne, of Dronfield, in this

County, the great grandfon of Immanuel, is the prefent patron and rector of Afh over. The infcription is in the chancel, on a large flab of freeftone, part within and part without the rails of the altar.

"Here lieth the body of JEMIMAN BOURNE, the eldest daughter of Sir Thomas Beckingham, of Tolfon Beckingham, in the county of Effex, and Dame Elizabeth, his wife, and the relict of Immanuel Bourne, late rector and patron of this church, who died June the 19th, 1679, aged 79." Yours, &c.

A. W.

Mr. URBAN, July 5. SEE an enquiry in your laft Magazine, p. 504, for the epitaph of Im manuel Bourne, at Ahover, in the county of Derby. I was there a year or two fince, but find no fuch perfon mentioned in my notes, It appears from a mural tablet in the chancel, that Obadiah Bourne, M.A. died April 8, 1710, æt. 64; and his widow, Jan. 19, 1711. I tranfcribed the following, which is at the fervice of your correfpondent:

Near this place lies interred REBECCA, wife of OBADIAH BOURNE, A.M. Rector of this parith, and daughter of John Lynch, efq+ of Grove, in Kent, who departed this life Aug. 31, 1754, æt. 62.

As her life had been remarkable for the amiable qualities of an affectionate wife, a tender parent, and a finçere friend, all heightened and improved by a principle of religion; fo her death was greatly lamented by all who knew her, but by none more juftly than her difconfolate Hufband, who erected this monument to her memory, and ordered that, at his death,

his bones fhould be laid near her. There is a grandfon of this match now living, in Orders, on whom the late Dr.

*We request the favour of copies of their epitaphs, particularly of the "mural tablet" mentioned by N. S. EDIT.

Father of John Lynch, D. D. Dean of Canterbury, who was father of Sir Wilham Lynch, K. B. who died 1785, and of John Lynch, D.D. now Archdeacon of Canterbury.

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AMONGST the many useful pur pofes which your Mifcellany has long been celebrated, it has no fmall merit in reviving enquiries after detached literary works, bringing under contemplation the unedited labours of our predeceffors, and thereby aiding the revival of perishing literature.

The queries and fuggeftions with which your learned correfpondents, from time to time, furnish the Gentleman's Magazine, operate, as I have often thought, in the manner of fencing or parrying with a file; they raise the fkin, caufe an irritation, and fometimes pierce deep into the flesh, an operation which generates matter, which, without a pun, it is often neceffary to difcufs. With thefe reflexions, I addrefs myfelf to you, claiming a few moments of your attention to the following queries, fully fenfible that, through the medium of your Repofitory, I am most likely to obtain the information I am folicitous about.

1. Have the executors or administrators of the excelient Dr. John Brown, author of the "Eftimate of the Manners and Principles of the Times," fullled that part of his will which required. that his work, "The Principles of Chriflian Legiflation," fhould be publihed immediately after his decease? If not, why has fo important a bequest

been withheld?

2. The learned English hiftorian, Thomas Carte, published four volumes of the History of England to the date of 1654. His defign was to bring down the narration to the Revolution, but death interrupted it in the year 1754. His materials, I apprehend, are lodged in the Bodleian library, after having been confuited by Earl Hardwicke at the price of 2col.; and by Mr. Macpher fon, who paid 3001, for a perutal of them, from whence he compiled the best part of his Hiftory and State Papers. How long is the world to be deprived of thefe valuables in truft?

3. Is there any real good edition of

the

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