More Solid Learning: New Perspectives on Alexander Pope's Dunciad

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Catherine Ingrassia, Claudia N. Thomas
Bucknell University Press, 2000 - 254 Seiten
These essays teach Pope's Dunciad from a variety of perspectives. Contributors issues including Pope's psychosexual development, his antipathy to opera, Pope's centrality in the debates over the often-gendered nature of literary labor, and his repudiation in Book IV of The Dunciad of the concepts of masculine conduct from which he was excluded, the reconstruction of Pope's body and persona in Edmund Curll's pamphlets responding to the 1728 Dunciad, and Pope's adaptation of the Renaissance satirist's "Rabelaisian" imagery and purposes.

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Inhalt

Acknowledgments
9
More Solid Learning Pope The Dunciad and the Academy
13
Opera Gender and Sexual Politics in The Dunciad
33
The Role of Handel in Popes The Dunciad in Four Books
62
Gibber The Dunciad and the Masculine Self
81
The Prostitution of the Author and the Business of Culture
106
Pope and the Man of Leisure in The Dunciad
129
Pope Curll and the Portrait of a Hack Writer
147
Alexander Popes 1743 Dunciad and MockApocalypse
166
Pope Rabelais and the Fair
189
Notes
208
Notes on Contributors
244
Index
246
Urheberrecht

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Beliebte Passagen

Seite 180 - Then the eyes of the blind shall be opened, and the ears of the deaf shall be unstopped. Then shall the lame man leap as an hart and the tongue of the dumb sing, for in the wilderness shall waters break out, and streams in the desert.
Seite 141 - Plac'd at the door of learning, youth to guide, We never suffer it to stand too wide. To ask, to guess, to know, as they commence, As fancy opens the quick springs of sense, We ply the memory, we load the brain, Bind rebel wit, and double chain on chain, Confine the thought, to exercise the breath, And keep them in the pale of words till death.
Seite 225 - A Letter from Mr. Gibber to Mr. Pope, Inquiring into the Motives that might induce him in his Satyrical Works, to be frequently fond of Mr. Cibber's Name.
Seite 90 - Religion, blushing, veils her sacred fires, And unawares Morality expires. Nor public flame, nor private, dares to shine; Nor human spark is left, nor glimpse divine! Lo! thy dread empire, Chaos ! is restored; Light dies before thy uncreating word; Thy hand, great Anarch, lets the curtain fall, And universal darkness buries all.
Seite 88 - Fruits of dull heat, and sooterkins of wit. Next, o'er his books his eyes began to roll, In pleasing memory of all he stole, How here he sipp'd, how there he plunder'd snug, And suck'd all o'er, like an industrious bug.
Seite 232 - Peter Stallybrass and Allon White, The Politics and Poetics of Transgression (London: Methuen, 1986), 3.
Seite 16 - Oh let me live my own, and die so too ! (To live and die is all I have to do :) Maintain a poet's dignity and ease, And see what friends, and read what books I please ; Above a patron, tho' I condescend Sometimes to call a minister my friend.
Seite 180 - Be smooth, ye rocks! ye rapid floods, give way! The Saviour comes! by ancient bards foretold: Hear him, ye deaf! and all ye blind, behold! He from thick films shall purge the visual ray, And on the sightless eyeball pour the day: 'Tis he th' obstructed paths of sound shall clear And bid new music charm th' unfolding ear: The dumb shall sing, the lame his crutch forego, And leap exulting like the bounding roe.
Seite 91 - Where, in nice balance, truth with gold she weighs, And solid pudding against empty praise. Here she beholds the Chaos dark and deep, Where nameless Somethings in their causes sleep, 'Till genial Jacob, or a warm Third day, Call forth each mass, a Poem, or a Play: How hints, like spawn, scarce quick in embryo lie, How new-born nonsense first is taught to cry, 60 Maggots half-form'd in rhyme exactly meet, And learn to crawl upon poetic feet.
Seite 114 - The moon-struck prophet felt the madding hour : Then rose the seed of Chaos, and of Night, To blot out order, and extinguish light, Of dull and venal a new world to mould, And bring Saturnian days of lead and gold.

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