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INDEX

AIKEN, CATHERINE, her method | Bear, grizzly, a story told by

of training the perceptions of
school-children, 11, 12.
Andrena, 13, 14.

Animals, human traits in, 125–153,

190-192; homing instinct in,
126, 127; superior to man in cer-
tain powers, 126, 127; telepathy
in, 127, 128; unreasoning anger
in, 129, 130; the training of wild,
131-133; courtship among, 134,
135; gregarious instincts of, 135,
136; maternal affection in, 137;
conjugal affection in, 137, 138;
hermits among, 138; hostility
towards strangers among, 138;
grief and sympathy among, 139,
140; fear in, 140, 141; revenge
among, 142, 143; notions of
death among, 146; deception in,
146; coöperation in, 146, 147;
leadership among, 147, 148;
worry among, 148; terror among,
149; play of, 149, 150; imita-
tiveness in, 150; the reasoning
powers of, 155-169; Hobhouse's
experiments on, 160-162; rela-
tion of language to intelligence
in, 163,164; instincts in, 169–172,
177-198; their dependence on
Nature, 189, 190; the tools of,
195.

President Roosevelt, 142, 143.
Beard, Dan, his "Animal Book,"

160; his observation of an ich-
neumon-fly, 185.

Beaver, lack of real intelligence in,
180, 194.

Bees, a burrowing bee, 13, 14;
Fabre's experiment with a bee,

185.

Birch, growing on rocks, 173-175.
Birds, nesting-times of various, 31;

love, alarm, and fellowship notes
of, 40, 41; courtship among, 43,
91-98, 134, 135; coloration of,
53-100; nesting-materials of, 77,
78; the gregarious, 88-90, 135,
136; their manner of carrying
things, 116, 117; conjugal affec-
tion in, 137, 138; home sense in,
138; learning songs, 150; taste
in, 151-153; cause and use of
song in, 151, 152.

Bluebird (Sialia sialis), a story of
love and rivalry, 38-43; notes of,
40, 41; coloration of, 68; decima-
tion and recovery of, 84.
Bostock, Frank C., his "Training
of Wild Animals," 131, 132.
Brakeman, an unintelligent, 181.
Browning, Robert, a text from,
263.

Apes, relationship with man, 222- Business, 256.

224.

April, joys of, 35-37.

Arbutus, praise of, 33-35.

Ash tree, 173.

Autobiographic, 241-261.

Carlyle, Thomas, on evolution,
215-219; quoted, 215.

Casarita, 181, 182.

Chance, 275, 276.

Chippy. See Sparrow, chipping.

Baynes, Ernest Harold, his young Cicada, 17.

coons, 180, 181.
Bear, a story told by President
Roosevelt, 128, 129; a trained,
132.

Clover, red, fragrance of, 26, 27.
Color in animals, a study of, 51-

100; effect of locality on, 59, 60;
effect of cold on, 64, 65; effect of

darkness on, 65; effect of domes- | Evil, the origin of, 268–270; good

tication on, 68-70; gradation of,
71, 72; stamp of environment
on, 78-84; influence of the male
instinct of reproduction on, 87,
88, 91-100; influence of the gre-
garious instinct on, 87-91.
Coloration, protective, 51-100.
Columbine, 35.

Coon. See Raccoon.

Cows, path-making on hillsides by,
156, 157; a cow opening a gate,
157, 158; milk-manufacturing by,
159; a cow and a stuffed calf,
180.

Crabs, courtship of, 99.

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impossible without, 270-272;
no conspiracy of, 273; the uni-
versal struggle against, 276-279.
Evolution, 215–240.

Fabre, J. H., his experiments on a
wasp and a bee, 184, 185.
Farm, the call of the, 36-38.
Farmer, the, and his fields, 45-50.
Fear, in wild and domestic animals,
69, 70.

Fields, the farmer's, 45–50.
Fire, origin of, 235.

Flamingo (Phanicopterus ruber),
89.

Flicker. See High-hole.

Creeper, brown (Certhia familiaris
americana), coloration and hab-
its of, 86, 87.

Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos), re-
lation of coloration to habits of,
90; its manner of picking up
food from water, 116, 117.
Cuckoo, 30.

Darwin, Charles, 65, 72; his theory
of sexual selection, 92-100; rea-
son and imagination in, 112;
quoted on taste in birds, 151,
167; quoted on the casarita, 181,
182; Carlyle on, 215, 218.
Dogs, biting a stone, 131; anger in,
131; human traits in, 143–146;
John Muir's dog, 149; Hob-
house's experiments with, 161;
hunting woodchucks, 162; lack
of reasoning in, 188, 189.
Ducks, 70, 71; a prodigal, 192, 193.
Dust, the substance of all things,
199.

Eagle, 117.

Eaton, Daniel Cady, 22.
Edwards, Jonathan, 275.
Electricity, 209.

Elephants, Hobhouse's

Flycatcher, great crested (Myi-
archus crinitus), 23.
Fox, 109, 114.
Fox, arctic, 57.
Freedom of will, 281.
Freeman, Edward Augustus, 110-
112.

Frog, wood, 66.

Froude, James Anthony, 110-112.

Geddes, Patrick, and J. Arthur
Thomson, their "Evolution of
Sex," 100.

Geologic time, 236, 237.
Goat, mountain, 58.
God, the first cause, 228; the im-
manent, 233; Cardinal New-
man's view of, 265; created by
man in his image, 266; in the
human heart, 266, 267; as seen
in the universe, 273, 274; his will
to be found in the order of the
universe, 282.
Grasshoppers, colors of, 66.
Gregariousness, its influence on the
colors of animals, 88-91; in man
and animals, 135, 136.

Groos, Karl, 149.

experi- Grosbeak, rose-breasted (Zame-
lodia ludoviciana), 32, 76.

ments with, 160, 161.
Emerson, Ralph Waldo, quoted,
242.

Erythronium, or fawn lily, 185,
186.

Eternity, 238.

Eugénie, Empress, 6.

Grouse, ruffed (Bonasa umbellus),
coloration and feeding habits of,
87.

Hamerton, Philip Gilbert, his story
of a cow, 180.

[blocks in formation]

Hobhouse, L. T., his "Mind and Morality, truth in, 252.

Evolution," 160-162.

Homing instinct, the, 126, 127.
Hornaday, William T., 177.
Hornet, black, 162.
Hornets, 197.

Huxley, Thomas Henry, 159, 163,
190; and Carlyle, 215, 218, 224,
237; a fighter, 250, 265; quoted,
207, 208, 249.

Ichneumon-fly, 185.
Immortality, 251.
Infinite, the, 238-240.

Instinct, and reason, 177, 178; a
kind of intelligence, 179; au-
tomatism of, 179-188; the re-
sponse to, 189; the sufficiency
of, 196, 198.

June, the opening of, 26-32.

Keller, Helen, 11.

Lemming, 64, 186, 187.
Life, first appearance of, 208; the
origin of, 229-236; the mechan-
ico-chemical theory of, 232-234;
positive and negative sides of,
268, 269; a balance between
good and evil forces, 269.
Life (of man), meaning of, 241-261.
Lily, fawn. See Erythronium.
Long, William J., 198.

Loon (Gavia imber), 118.

one direction, 20.

Morgan, C. Lloyd, quoted on rea-
son in animals, 178.
Morgan, L. H., 194.

Moth, expanding wings of a, 15,

16; a yellowish-white, 17.
Moth, Cecropia, cocoon of, 19.
Moth, Promethea, cocoon of, 18.
Muir, John, 149.

Mushrooms, colors of, 67.

Natural history, truth and false-
hood in, 101-115, 122, 123.
Nature, an inexhaustible store-
house, 3; demoralized by man,
69; tendency to harmony in,
79, 80; truth and falsehood in
writing about, 101-115, 122,
123; the school of, 197; a spend-
thrift, 246; wins in every game,
246, 247.

Nature fakers, 101-115, 122, 123.
Newman, Cardinal, 265, 266.
Nuthatch, white-bellied (Sitta caro-
linensis), colors and habits of, 86,
87.

Observation, considered as an art,
1,2; love the secret of, 2, 3; dif-
ference between people in powers
of, 4-10; training of powers of,
11, 12; sharpened by the thought,
21-23; power of accurate, pos-
sessed by few, 116, 118.
Observer, a close, 7-9.

Lost persons, tendency to turn in Orchards, blossoming, 31, 32.

Oriole, puncturing grapes, 21.

Love, sharpens the senses, 2; the Oriole, Baltimore (Icterus galbula),

measure of life, 3.

Lyell, Sir Charles, 218.

Maeterlinck, Maurice, 175.
Man, ancestry of, 215-224, 226-
229, 236, 237; at home in the
universe, 221; relationship with
the -anthropoid apes, 222-224;
a part of nature, 267; more and

compared with orchard oriole,
85; two pairs fighting, 191.

Oriole, orchard (Icterus spurius),
compared with Baltimore oriole,
85, 86.
Otter, 160, 161.

Peacock, 54.

Petrifaction and putrefaction, 3.

Pheasant, Argus, 94-96.
Phœbe-bird (Sayornis phœbe), notes
of, 36; nest of, 193, 194.
Pigeon, passenger, or wild pigeon
(Ectopistes migratorius), 76.
Plants, apparent intelligence of,
171-175.

Providences, 244, 245.
Ptarmigan, 64.

Quail, or bob-white (Colinus vir-
ginianus), 53.

Quail, valley, or valley partridge
(Lophortyx califordicus
cola), 57.

Raccoon, its habit of washing its
food, 180, 181.

Sight, the beginning of the sense
of, 168.

Simple life, the, 241, 242, 260,
261.

Skunk, carrying one by the tail,
103.

Snake, swallowing young, 18.
Soil, the, the grist of the gods,
the medium through which all
things pass, 199-209, 212; the
divine, 203, 215-240.

Soul, the, physical origin of, 233,
234.

valli-Sparrow, chipping, or social spar-
row (Spizella socialis), 28.
Sparrow, English, or house spar-
row (Passer domesticus), court-
ship of, 98, 135; an instance of
blind instinct in, 187.
Spencer, Herbert, 149.
Spider, trap-door, 183, 184.
Spider, wolf, the den of a, 14, 15.
Spiritual, the, has its roots in the
carnal, 221.

Rays of light in openings in clouds,
20, 21.

Reason, the dawn of, 165–169; the
appeal to, 253. See also Animals,
the reasoning powers of.
Religion, the truth in, 251, 252.
Reproductive instinct, its influ-
ence on the colors of animals, 87,
88, 91-100.
Road-runner (Geococcyx califor-
nianus), 54.

Roberts, Charles G. D., 113, 114,
198.

Robin (Merula migratoria), 43;
abundance and adaptability of,
84, 85; food of, 85; baffled and
delayed in nest-building, 130,
131; courtship of, 135.
Roosevelt, Theodore, bear stories
told by, 128, 129, 142, 143;
quoted on antelope, 147, 148;
and a frightened deer, 149.
Roots, apparent intelligence of,
173-175.

Ross, Sir John, 64.

Science, shows man that he is not

an alien in nature, 280.
Scott, Sir Walter, and nature, 9.
10.

Seal, fur, 148.

Selection, sexual, 92-100.

Sharp, Dallas Lore, his tame coon,
181.

Sheep, laying out paths, 156, 157.

Spring, beginning of, 25.
Squirrel, red, harvesting butter-

nuts, 17, 18; playing, 149, 150;
and a drain pipe, 180.
Squirrels, position of feet in de-
scending trees, 5.
Stone walls, 48-50.

Stones, clearing fields of, 46-48.
Struggle for existence, the, 276-
279.
Summer, beginning of, 25-32; the
bridal day of, 27, 28.
Sundew, 158.

Tennyson, Alfred, quoted, 26.
Thomson, J. Arthur. See Patrick
Geddes.

Thoreau, Henry D., as an ob-
server, 6, 22; and the farm, 38;
and the " woodcock's evening
hymn," 121; his eye more re-
liable than his ear, 121, 122; his
instinct for the truth in nature,
122; his use of the imagination,
122, 123; quoted, 38.
Thrush, wood (Hylocichla muste-
lina), 131.

Thrushes, ground, 56.
Toad, color of, 66.

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