A Letter on the National Society's Training-college for Schoolmasters, Stanley Grove, Chelsea, Adressed to the Rev. John Sinclair

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J.W. Parker, 1842 - 46 Seiten
 

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Seite 14 - ... for this purpose, which draw many more people into those trades than could otherwise pretend to follow them. In all Christian countries, I believe, the education of the greater part of churchmen is paid for in this manner. Very few of them are educated altogether at their own expense.
Seite 1 - ... widely) is too often little more than nominal, imparting, it may be, a little knowledge — sometimes hardly this — but leaving the mental powers wholly undeveloped, and the heart even less affected than the mind. Of course there are exceptions and limitations to this statement. It does not apply to every school, and is less true of some districts than of others; but the fact, as a whole, stands upou what may be called statistical evidence.
Seite 2 - Can we hope that it will be duly performed for less than labourer's wages, without present estimation or hope of preferment, by the first rustic, broken-down tradesman, or artisan out of employment, whom necessity, or perhaps indolence, brings to the office? Not to put an aggravated case, however common, can any half-educated man from the working classes (and the majority of those who seek to be schoolmasters are all but ««educated), be safely entrusted with duties, the very nature of which it...
Seite 39 - ... the National Society for promoting the Education of the Poor in the principles of the Established Church throughout England and Wales...
Seite 25 - The parochial schoolmaster who shall be able to assist, by example and precept, in fostering a taste so favourable to the domestic happiness, and, in fact, to the domestic virtues, of a rustic population — a taste by which an air of comfort is communicated to the rudest dwelling, and a certain grace thrown over the simplest forms of humble life, will, it is trusted, in this as in so many other ways, be made an instrument of good, and an efficient assistant to the parochial clergyman.
Seite 5 - I include the master of every church-school for the poor, is encompassed with difficulties to which an ordinary commercial or grammar school offers no parallel. Not merely has he a greater number of children to instruct, with less assistance and in a less time— children, for the most part, of tenderer years, and less prepared by previous instruction and home-training—but he has more to do for them.
Seite 5 - I do not say that it is easy to meet with a man of good sense and right feeling, putting aside acquirement, to whom the oversight of children may be committed. I believe it will be found very difficult. But something in this way might be done; some fatherly discipline established; some lessons of humble wisdom imparted. From the other mode, nothing in the long-run but mischief can ensue. Wherever mere attainment is made a principal consideration, there will be a perpetual mistaking of means for ends,...
Seite 10 - The object being to produce schoolmasters for the poor, the endeavour must on the one hand to raise the students morally and intellectually to a certain standard, while, on the other hand, we train them in lowly service...
Seite 1 - ... leaving the mental powers wholly undeveloped, and the heart even less affected than the mind. Of course there are exceptions and limitations to this statement. It does not apply to every school, and is less true of some districts than of others ; but the fact, as a whole, stands upon what may be called statistical evidence. Is this owing to an accidental or to an inherent defect? Are the means employed inadequate merely, or essentially unfit ? If the former, we may trust to time and gradual improvement....
Seite 4 - Attainments may make a particular teacher — a professor, as such teachers affect to call themselves — but a mere teacher has much to learn before he can undertake to educate. A sound and, to a considerable extent, a cultivated understanding; a certain moral power, the growth of religious principles but developed by intellectual culture, — surely this is an essential prerequisite in every educator, every schoolmaster, before we inquire into his special fitness for the class of children of which...

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