Castles in the Air: And Other Phantasies

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Hurd and Houghton, 1871 - 352 Seiten
 

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Seite 43 - Fair daffodils, we weep to see You haste away so soon: As yet the early-rising sun Has not attained his noon. Stay, stay, Until the hasting day Has run But to the evensong; And, having prayed together, we Will go with you along. » We have short time to stay as you; We have as short a spring; As quick a growth to meet decay, As you or anything.
Seite 295 - For he crush'd him between two stones. And they hae taen his very heart's blood, And drank it round and round; And still the more and more they drank, Their joy did more abound. John Barleycorn was a hero bold, Of noble enterprise ; For if you do but taste his blood, Twill make your courage rise. 'Twill make a man forget his woe; 'Twill heighten all his joy : 'Twill make the widow's heart to sing, Tho
Seite 5 - GATHER ye rosebuds while ye may, Old Time is still a-flying; And this same flower that smiles to-day, To-morrow will be dying. The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun, The higher he's a-getting, The sooner will his race be run, And nearer he's to setting. That age is best which is the first, When youth and blood are warmer; But being spent, the worse and worst Times still succeed the former. Then be not coy, but use your time...
Seite 268 - The inspiring breeze, and meditate the book Of Nature, ever open ; aiming thence, Warm from the heart, to learn the moral song ; And, as I steal along the sunny wall, Where Autumn basks, with fruit empurpled deep, My pleasing theme continual prompts my thought : Presents the downy peach ; the shining plum, With a fine bluish mist of animals Clouded ; the ruddy nectarine ; and dark, Beneath his ample leaf, the luscious fig.
Seite 289 - I go bare, take ye no care, I nothing am a-cold ; I stuff my skin so full within Of jolly good ale and old. Back and side go bare, go bare ; Both foot and hand go cold ; But, belly, God send thee good ale enough, Whether it be new or old.
Seite 267 - Here be grapes, whose lusty blood Is the learned poet's good. Sweeter yet did never crown The head of Bacchus ; nuts more brown Than the squirrel's teeth that crack them...
Seite 237 - The early cherry, with the later plum, Fig, grape, and quince, each in his time doth come; The Blushing apricot, and woolly peach Hang on thy walls, that every child may reach.
Seite 247 - Fruits that shall swell in sunny June, And redden in the August noon, And drop, when gentle airs come by, That fan the blue September sky, While children...
Seite 279 - So now is come our joyful'st feast; Let every man be jolly ; Each room with ivy leaves is drest, And every post with holly. Though some churls at our mirth repine, Round your foreheads garlands twine, Drown sorrow in a cup of wine, And let us all be merry. Now all our neighbours...
Seite 290 - Not in my life, Sir. I have fed purely upon ale; I have eat my ale, drank my ale, and I always sleep upon ale.

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