A Catalogue of the Royal and Noble Authors of England, Scotland, and Ireland;: With Lists of Their Works:, Band 1

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Seite 250 - Then shalt thou know beauty but lent, And wish and want as I have done. Now cease, my lute, this is the last 'Labour, that thou and I shall waste ; And ended is that we begun : Now is this song both sung and past ; My lute, be still, for I have done.
Seite 84 - Christ was the word that spake it, He took the bread and brake it, And what that word did make it, That I believe and take it.
Seite 138 - To conclude, he was the worthiest gentleman, the best master, the best friend, the best husband, the best father, and the best Christian, that the age in which he lived produced.
Seite x - Scaliger compares to the labours of the anvil and the mine ; that what is obvious is not always known, and what is known is not always present ; that sudden fits of inadvertency will surprise vigilance, slight avocations will seduce attention, and casual eclipses of the mind will darken learning ; and that the writer shall often in vain trace his memory at the moment of need for that which yesterday he knew with intuitive...
Seite 120 - Mr. George Herbert being Prselector in the Rhetorique School in Cambridge anno 1618, pass'd by those fluent Orators that Domineered in the Pulpits of Athens and Rome, and insisted to Read upon an Oration of King James, which he analysed...
Seite 136 - Some historians have rashly questioned the good faith of this prince: But, for this reproach, the most malignant scrutiny of his conduct, which, in every circumstance is now thoroughly known, affords not any reasonable foundation.
Seite 193 - Stage-poets have themselves been very bold with, and others very merry at, the memory of Sir John Oldcastle ; whom they have fancied a boon companion, a jovial...
Seite 250 - As to be heard where ear is none, As lead to grave in marble stone, My song may pierce her heart as soon; Should we then sigh or sing or moan?
Seite 94 - The queen was brought by water to Whitehall, At every stroke the oars did tears let fall. More clung about the barge ; fish under water Wept out their eyes of pearl, and swam blind after.
Seite 96 - Yea I believe, that beside her perfect readiness in Latin, Italian, French, and Spanish, she readeth here now at Windsor more Greek every day than some prebendary of this church doth read Latin in a whole week.

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