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THE

POETICAL WORKS

OF

EDMUND SPENSER:

WITH

THE LIFE OF THE AUTHOR;

AND

THE CRITICAL REMARKS

OF

HUGHES, SPENCE, WARTON, UPTON, AND HURD.

And thou, O Colin! heaven-defended youth,
Shalt hide in fiction's veil the charms of truth;
Thy notes the sting of sorrow sball-beguile,
And smooth the brow of anguish till it smile i
Notes that a sweet Elysian dream can raise,
And lead th'enchanted soul thro' fancy's maze;
Thy verse shall shine with Gloriana's name,
And fill the world with Britain's endless fame.

SIR W. JONES.

IN NINE VOLUMES.

VOL. IU.

ܪ

London: Printed for Cadell and Davies; Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme;

Nichols and Son; J. Walker; Wilkie and Robinson; W. J. and J. Richardson; F.C. and J. Rivington; Lackington, Allen, and Co; R. H. Evans; Cuthell and Martin; Scatcherd and Letterman; Otridge and son; Vernor, Hood, and Sharpe; R. Faul. der; T. Payne; J. Nunn; R. Lea; J. Deighton ; J. Johnson; w. Clarke and Sons; W. Lowndes; J. Hatchard; Black and Parry; J. Harding ; E. Jeffery; J. Čarpenter; W. Miller; Leigh and Sotheby; Payne and Mackinlay; Mathews aná

Leigh; P. Wynne; J. Booker; and
SAMUEL BAGSTER.

1807.'

8 Harvard College Library HA V Liv sQUEST,

May 17, 1897.

SPENSER'S POEMS.

THE FAERIE QUEENE.

BOOK II. CANTO X.

A chronicle of Briton kings,
From Brute to Uther's rayne;
And rolls of Elfin emperours,
Till time of Gloriane.

I.

Who now shall give unto me words and sound
Equall unto this haughty enterprise ?
Or who shall lend me wings,with which from ground
My lowly verse may loftily arise,
And lift itselfe unto the highest skyes ?
More ample spirit then hetherto was wount
Here needes me, whiles the famous auncestryes
Of my most dreaded Soveraine I recount,
By which all earthly princes she doth far surcount.

II.

Ne under sunne that shines so wide and faire,
Whence all that lives does borrow life and light,
Lives ought that to her linage may compaire ;
Which though from earth it be derived right,
Yet doth itselfe stretch forth to heveps hight,
And all the world with wonder overspred ;
A labor huge, exceeding far my might!
How shall fráile pen, with feare disparaged,
Conceive such soveraine glory and great bountybed?

SPENSER - TOL. III.

III.

IV.

Argument worthy of Mæonian quill,
Or rather worthy of great Phæbus rote,
Whereon the ruines of great Ossa hill,
And triumphes of Phlegræan love he, wrote,
That all the gods admird his lofty note.
But if some relish of that hevenly lay
His learned daughters would to me report,
To decke my song withall, I would assay
Thy name,

O soveraine Queene! to blazon far away. But
Thy name, O soveraine Queene! thy realme and
From this renowmed prince derived arre, (race,
Who mightily upbeld that royall mace,
Which now thou bear'st, to thee descended farre
From mighty kings and conquerours in warre,
Thy fathers and great-grandfathers of old,
Whose noble deeds above the northern starre
Immortall Fame for ever hath enrold;
As in that Old Man's booke they were in order told.

V.
The land which warlike Britons now possesse,
And therein have their mighty empire raysd,
In antique times was salvage wildernesseg-
Unpeopled, unmannurd, unprovd, unpraysd;
Ne was it island then, ne was it paysd
Amid the ocean waves, ne was it sought
Of merchants farre for profits therein praysd;
But was all desolate, and of some thought
By sea to have bene from ilie Celticke mayn-land

brought.

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