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because in religion he was serious without lays the best foundation for extending its bigotry. From the retirement of a college practical application, sends at the same time he stepped at once into the circle of a court; io exalı its character, and dignify its pursuit. but he has not been dazzled by its glare, As a Lecturer on Chemistry, it is impossible nor tainted by its corruptions. As a prelate, to praise too highly the superior talents of he does honour to the gratitude of a patron Dr. Murray: always perfectly master of his who was once his pupil, and to the dignity subject, and very successful in the performof a station where, in his wise and honest ance of his experiments, which were sejudgment upon things, great duries are con- lected with great judgment, his manner had nected with great emoluments. If, from a natural ease and animation, which shewed general description, I were permitted to de- evidently that his mind went along with scend to particular detail, I should say, that every thing he uttered, and gave his lectures in one instance he exhibited a noble proof great freedom and spirit. But his peculiar of generosity, by refusing to accept the legal excellence as a teacher was a most uncomand customary profits of his office from a mon faculty, arising from the great perpeasantry bending down under the weight of spicuity and distinctness of his conceptions, indigence and exaction. I should say, that, of leading his hearers step by step through upon another occasion, he did not suffer the whole process of the most complex inhimself to be irritated by perverse and auda- vestigation, with such admirable clearness, cious opposition; but, blending mercy with that they were induced to think that he was justice, spared a misguided father for the following out a natural order which could sake of a distressed dependent family, and not be avoided, at the very time when he provided, at the same time, for the instruc- was exhibiting a specimen of the most retion of a large and populous parish, without fined and subtle analysis. With bim the pushing to extremes his episcopal rights student did not merely accumulate facis, when invaded, and his episcopal power note down dry results, or stare at amusing when defied. While the English universi- experiments: he was led irresistibly to exerties produce such scholars, they will indeed cise his own mind, and trained to the habits deserve to be considered as the nurseries of of accurate induction. To those solid atlearning and virtue. While the church of tainments which entitled Dr. Murray to stand Ireland is adorned by such prelates, it can- in the first rank as a man of science, was not have much to fear from that spirit of united a refined taste, and a liberal acquaintrestless discontent and excessive refinement ance with every subject of general interest which has lately gone abroad. It will be in literature. His manners were easy, po instrumental to the best purposes by the best lite, and unpretending, regulated by a delimeans. It will gain fresh security and fresh cate sense of propriety, with much of that lustre from the support of wise and good simplicity which often accompanies men. It will promote the noblest interests strength of character and originality of of society, and uphold, in this day of peril, mind. He rose to eminence by the intrinsic the sacred cause of true religion.

force of his talents; he was above all the “ Sweet is the refreshment afforded to second-hand arts by which so many labour my soul by the remembrance of such a to attract attention; and a native dignity of scholar, such a man, and such a friend, as sentiment, and manly spirit of independence, Dr. Win. Bennet, Bishop of Cork."

kept him aloof from all those petty intrigues which are so often employed with success to

bolster-up inferior pretensions. July 22, died, at his house, in Nicolson

Dr. Murray published Elements of Chestreet, Edinburgh, Dr. John Murray, Lecturer mistry, 2 vols. 8vo. 1801, 2d edit. 1810. in Natural Philosophy, Chemistry, Materia -Elements of Materia Medica and PharMedica, and Pharmacy, at F.dinburgh.

macy, 2 vols. 8vo. 1804.-A System of The death of this distinguished philoso

Chemistry, 4 vols. 8vo. 1806.-Supplement pher, snatched from us in the prime of life,

to the System of Chemistry, svo. 1809. and full vigour of his faculties, will long be A System of Materia Medica, and Pharmacy,

2 vols. 8vo. 1810. felt as a national loss. His works, now of standard celebrity at home and abroad, have,

SIR HOME RIGGS POPHAM. from the spirit of profound and accurate Admiral Sir Home Riggs Popham, K.C.B. analysis which they every where display, had but recently returned from his command and from the force, clearness, and precision on the Jamaica station, where he lost his of their statements, most essentially con- daughter and his health. Few men had seen tributed to advance Chemistry to the high more service, or have displayed more talent. rank which it now holds among the liberal He rose entirely by his own merits. This sciences. His very acute, vigorous, and gallant officer was born in Ireland, about comprehensive mind has been most success- the year 1762. His father had a numerous fully exerted in arranging its numerous and family, and his means being slender, the daily multiplying details, defining its laws, boys were obliged to seek their fortunes in and, above all, in attaching to it a spirit of different parts of the globe. Sir Home, who philosophical investigation, which, while it was a younger son, entered the British Navy

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DR. JOHN MURRAY.

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MR. RAE.

as a Midshipman." During the American ratý retreat in the bosom of his family, the war he attained the rank of Lieutenant. On restoration of his health ; but his happiness the retum of peace he visited his eldest bro- in this retirement wus considerably embitther, Major, now General Popham, in India, tered by the unconquerable nature of his and having evinced a genius for nautical to- complaint, which has at length, in the prime pography, he was appointed, at the special of his life, in the full enjoyment of his farecommendation of Lord Cornwallis, one of culties and fortune, and after attaining to a a Committee sent in 1778 to survey New high rank in his profession, thus prematurely Harbour, in the river Hoogly. He also ap- terminated his existence. pears, in 1791, to have commanded a couir- Captain Wood (then a commander) had try ship. He was afterwards appointed to the honour of serving under the late glorious the command of the Etrusco, an Imperial Lord Duncan during the whole period of his East Indiaman, which was seized, on her re- Lordship's command in the North Sea, and, tum from Bengal to Ostend, by an English at the mutiny at the Nore, was the happy frigate, as a prize, on the ground that a instrument of detaching many of the disconsiderable portion of the property on board affected scamen from that alarming and belonged to British subjects.

threatening confederacy; of securing the * The French Revolution soon afforded an ring-leaders of some of the most refractory opportunity of agaiir restoring him to his crews; and of carrying two of his Majesty's profession, and opening a new road to fame line of battle ships into Sheerness harbour. and fortune. The communication between The prompt zeal and activity 'so invariably the Duke of York and Nimeguen, when that displayed by Capt. W. during the period of place was besieged by Pichegru, in 1794, his services in the North Sea, insured him having been cut off, Lieutenant Popham the flattering approbation of Lord Duncan, proceeded thither from Ostend, and repaired which his Lordship took an early opporthe damage, and thus protracted the fate of tunity to testify by advancing him to the the town. For this service he was rewarded, rank of Post-Captain. Capt. Wood subsein 1795, with the rank first of Master and quently commanded the Concord and the Commander, and then of a Post Captain in Phaëton, in the East Indies, under Admirals the British Navy. In that year he acted as Rainier, the present Lord Exmouth, and Sir naval agent for the British transports on the Thomas Trowbridge. Continent; and under his inspection the British troops, which had been serving in This respectable performer died on the Holland, were embarked and escorted to 8th Sept. in his 39th year. His loss in the seEngland by the Dædalus and Amphion frie condary walk of tragedy will be sensibly felt. gates. In 1798, an armament was prepared His remains were deposited in Covent-garden in Margate Roads, which sailed under his Church-yard ; and although it v is a private command on the 14th of May, and ap- funeral,we recognized manyof his colleagues, peared off Ostend on the 19th. The troops, who were anxious to testify their regard withunder the command of Major-General Coote, out parade or ostentation. They were no having made a descent, blew up the sluice- actors here—their silent sympathy, in the 'gates; but the roughness of the sca pre- deprivation of an associate, cut off in the vented them from re-embarking, and they very prime of life, spoke most eloquently were forced to capitulate. He was next sent their estimation of his worth, their regret for to Russia in the Nile frigate, to the Emperor his loss, their respect for his memory; and Paul, who had evinced a disposition to join his survivors had the consolation of knowing, in an attempt to drive the French out of that though useless forms and ceremonies Holland. On this occasion he was to were dispensed with, his remains were em superintend the embarkation of the Russian balmed with the genuine tears of grateful troops, in quality of British Commissary. sensibility. We regret that he has left hiş In 1800 he sailed for the East Indies with a family (consisting of a wife, one son, and small squadroni, including the Romney, 50 two daughters) totally without provision; guns, and three other frigates; and after though we have, at the same time, the satisperforming various and valuable services, he faction of knowing, that the greatest interest returned in the Romney, in 1803. His is excited on behalf of his now destitute public employments and services have since widow and children.

Mr. Elliston has most been on a larger scale, and, as matter of liberally offered the use of his Theatre, and history, are generally known.

his brethren are most anxious to come fors CAPT. JOHN WOOD, R. N.

ward to further his benevolent intentions, Died, at his residence, Bramling-House, We know that, to a liberal pubiic, such an near Wingham, in the county of Kent, on appeal will not be made in vain; and as Saturday the 24th of June, in the 54th year Mr. Elliston's offer has been gratefully acof his age, Capt. John Wood, of the Royal cepted, we are assured that all the talent and Navy. A long and active service in the ability of the profession will shortly be exyaried and opposite climates of the North Sea erted, under distinguished patronage, at once and the tropical ocean, proluced a severe to testify their philanthropy for the living, hepatic affection, which, after 30 years ser- and the high estimation in which they held vice, compelled him to seek, under a tempo- their departed friend."

New MONTHLY MAG.-No. 81. VOL. XIV.

3 P

because in religion he was serious without lays the best foundation for extending its bigotry. From the retirement of a college practica application, tends at the same time he stepped at once into the circle of a court; to exalt its character, and dignify its pursuit. but he has not been dazzled by its glare, As a Lecturer on Chemistry, it is impossible nor tainted by its corruptions. As a prelate, to praise too highly the superior talents of he does honour to the gratitude of a patron Dr. Murray : always perfectly master of his who was once his pupil, and to the dignity subject, and very successful in the performof a station where, in his wise and honest ance of his experiments, which were sejudgment upon things, great duries are con- lected with great judgment, his manncr had nected with great emoluments. If, from a natural ease and animation, which shewed general description, I were permitted to de- evidently that his mind, went along with scend to particular detail, I should say, that every thing he uttered, and gave his lectures in one instance he exhibited a noble proof great freedom and spirit. But his peculiar of generosity, by refusing to accept the legal excellence as a teacher was a most uncomand customary profits of his office from a mon faculty, arising from the great perpeasantry bending down under the weight of spicuity and distinctness of his conceptions, indigence and exaction. I should say, that, of leading his hearers step by step through upon another occasion, he did not suffer the whole process of the most complex inhimself to be irritated by perverse and auda- vestigation, with such admirable clearness, cious opposition; but, blending mercy with that they were induced to think that he was justice, spared a misguided father for the following out a natural order which could sake of a distressed dependent family, and not be avoided, at the very time when he provided, at the same time, for the instruc- was exhibiting a specimen of the most retion of a large and populous parish, without fined and subtle analysis. With him the pushing to extremes his episcopal rights student did not merely accumulate facts, when invaded, and his episcopal power note down dry results, or stare at amusing when defied. While the English universi- experiments: he was led irresistibly to exerties produce such scholars, they will indeed cise his own mind, and trained to the habits deserve to be considered as the nurseries of of accurate induction. To those solid atlearning and virtue. While the church of tainments which entitled Dr. Murray to stand Ireland is adorned by such prelates, it can- in the first rank as a man of science, was not have much to fear from that spirit of united a refined taste, and a liberal acquaintrestless discontent and excessive refinement ance with every subject of general interest which has lately gone abroad. It will be in literature. His manners were easy, po instrumental to the best purposes by the best lite, and unpretending, regulated by a delimeans. It will gain fresh security and fresh cate sense of propriety, with much of that lustre from the support of wise and good simplicity which often accompanies men. It will promote the noblest interests strength of character and originality of of society, and uphold, in this day of peril, mind. He rose to eminence by the intrinsic the sacred cause of true religion.

force of his talents; he was above all the “ Sweet is the refreshment afforded to second-hand arts by which so many labour my soul by the remembrance of such a to attract attention; and a native dignity of scholar, such a man, and such a friend, as sentiment, and manly spirit of independence, Dr. Wm. Bennet, Bishop of Cork."

kept him aloof from all those petty intrigues which are so often employed with success to

bolster-up inferior pretensions. July 22, died, at his house, in Nicolson

Dr. Murray published Elements of Chestreet, Edinburgh, Dr. John Murray, Lecturer mistry, 2 vols. 8vo. 1801, 2d edit, 1819. in Natural Philosophy, Chemistry. Materia -Elements of Materia Medica and PharMedica, and Pharmacy, at Fdinburgh.

macy, 2 vols. 8vo. 1804.-A System of The death of this distinguished philoso- to the System of Chemistry, Bvo. 1809.

Chemistry, 4 vols. 8vo. 1806.-Supplement pher, snatched from us in the prime of life, A System of Materia Medica, and Pharmacy, and full vigour of his faculties, will long be felt as a national loss. His works, now of 2 vols. Svo. 1810. standard celebrity at home and abroad, have,

SIR HOME RIGGS POPHAM. from the spirit of profound and accurate Admiral Sir Home Riggs Popham, K.C.B. analysis which they every where display, had but recently returned from his command and from the force, clearness, and precision on the Jamaica station, where he lost his of their statements, most essentially con- daughter and his health. Few men had seen tributed to advance Chemistry to the high more service, or have displayed more talent. rank which it now holds among the liberal He rose entirely by his own merits. This sciences. His very acute, vigorous, and gallant officer was born in Ireland, about comprehensive mind has been most success- the year 1762. His father had a numerous fully exerted in arranging its numerous and family, and his means being slender, the daily multiplying details, defining its laws, boys were obliged to seek their fortunes in and, above all, in attaching to it a spirit of different parts of the globe. Sir Home, who philosophical investigation, which, while it was a younger son, entered the British Navy

1

SO

DR. JOHN MURRAY.

MR. RAE.

as a Midshipman." During the American rarý retreat in the boso

bosom of his family, the war he attained the rank of Lieutenant. On restoration of his health ; but his happiness the return of peace he visited his eldest bro- in this retirement was considerably embicther, Major, now General Popham, in India, tered by the unconquerable nature of his and having evinced a genius for nautical to- complaint, which has at length, in the prime pography, he was appointed, at the special of his life, in the full enjoyment of his farecommendation of Lord Cornwallis, one of culties and fortune, and after attaining to a a Committee sent in 1778 to survey New high rank in his profession, thus prematurely Harbour, in the river Hoogly. He also ap- terminated his existence. pears," in 1791, to have commanded a coun Captain Wood (then a commander) had try ship. He was afterwards appointed to the honour of serving under the late glorious the command of the Etrusco, an Imperial Lord Duncan during the whole period of his East Indiaman, which was seized, on her te. Lordship's command in the North Sea, and, turn from Bengal to Ostend, by an English at the mutiny at the Nore, was the happy frigate, as a prize, on the ground that a instrument of detaching many of the disconsiderable portion of the property on board affected scamen from that alarming and belonged to British subjects.

threatening confederacy; of securing the ** The French Revolution soon afforded an ring-leaders of some of the most refractory opportunity of again restoring him to his crews; and of carrying two of his Majesty's profession, and opening a new road to fame line of battle ships into Sheerness harbour. and fortune. The communication between The prompt zeal and activity 'so invariably the Duke of York and Nimeguen, when that displayed by Capt. W. during the period of place was besieged by Pichegru, in 1794, his services in the North Sea, insured him having been cut off, Lieutenant Popham the flattering approbation of Lord Duncan, proceeded thither from Ostend, and repaired which his Lordship took an early opporthe damage, and thus protracted the fate of tunity to testify by advancing him to the thie town. For this service he was rewarded, rank of Post-Captain. Capt. Wood subsein 1795, with the rank first of Master and quently commanded the Concord and the Commander, and then of a Post Captain in Phaëton, in the East Indies, under Admirals the British Navy. In that year he acted as Rainier, the present Lord Exmouth, and Sir naval agent for the British transports on the Thomas Trowbridge. Continent; and under his inspection the British troops, which had been serving in This respectable performer died on the Holland, were embarked and escorted to 8th Sepe. in his 39th year. His loss in the seEngland by the Dædalus and Amphion fri- condary walk of tragedy will be sensibly felt. gates. In 1798, an armament was prepared His remains were deposited in Covent-garden in Margate Roads, which sailed under his Church-yard; and although it v is a private command on the 14th of May, and ap- funeral, we recognized manyof his colleagues, peared off Ostend on the 19th. The troops, who were anxious to testify their regard withunder the command of Major-General Coote, out parade or ostentation. They were no having made a descent, blew up the sluice actors here—their silent sympathy, in the "gates; but the roughness of the sea pre- deprivation of an associate, cut off in the vented them from re-embarking, and they very prime of life, spoke most eloquently were forcer to capitulate. He was next sent their estimation of his worth, their regret for to Russia in the Nile frigate, to the Emperor his loss, their respect for his memory; and Paul, who had evinced a disposition to join his survivors had the consolation of knowing, in an attempt to drive the French out of that though useless forms and ceremonies Holland. On this occasion he was to were dispensed with, his remains were em superintend the embarkation of the Russian balmed with the genuine tears of grateful troops, in quality of British Commissary. sensibility. We regret that he has left his In 1800 he sailed for the East Indies with a family consisting of a wife, one son, and small squadron, including the Romney, 50 two daughters) totally without provision; guns, and three other frigates; and after though we have, at the same time, the satisperforming various and valuable services, he faction of knowing, that the greatest interest returned in the Romney, in 1803. His is excited on behalf of his now destitute public employments and services have since widow and children. Mr, Elliston has most been on a larger scale, and, as matter of liberally offered the use of his Theatre, and history, are generally known.

his brethren are most anxious to come forCAPT. JOHN WOOD, R. N.

ward to further his benevolent intentions, Died, at his residence, Bramling-House, We know that, to a liberal public, such an near Wingham, in the county of Kent, on appeal will not be made in vain; and as Saturday the 24th of June, in the 54th year Mr. Elliston's offer has been gratefully acof his age, Capt. John Wood, of the Royal cepted, we are assured that all the talent and Navy. A long and active service in the ability of the profession will shortly be exyaried and opposite climates of the North Sea erted, under distinguished patronage, at once and the tropical ocean, proluced a severe to testify their philanthropy for the living, hepatic affection, which, after 30 years ser- and the high estimation in which they held vice, compelled him to seek, under a tempo- their departed friend. New MONTHLY Mag.-No. 81. VOL. XIV.

3 P

PROVINCIAL OCCURRENCES, >
IN THE COUNTIES OF ENGLAND, ARRANGED ALPHABETICALLY,

BEDFORDSHIRE.

CHESHIRE. John Day, esq. is elected mayor of Bedford, for The Rev. Thomas Calvert, B. D. Norrisian Profes. the fourth time.

sor of Divinity in the university of Cambridge, to Married.] At St. Pancras, Edward Farn, esq. the rectory of Wimslow, or Wilmslow, in the dioto Matilda Priscilla, eldest daughter of the late cese of Chester, the same being vacant by an act Mr. John Wakefield, of Market-street.

of simony-patron, the King.

The Rev. Charles Kendrick Prescott, to the recBERKSHIRE.

tory of Stockport, vice his late father-patrons, Sept. 15.-The ceremonial of laying the founda- Lord and Lady Bulkeley. tion-stone of the New Church at Windsor took Married.]' At Chester, Mr. Connah, to Miss place this day.

Owens, of Trafford--Mr. Wm. Blake, to Miss Mr. John Lathom is elected mayor of Abingdon

Elizabeth Wilbraham-At Neston, H. L. Rigby, of for the year ensuing; and Mr. William Stephens, Hawarden, esq. to Mary Jane, eldest daughter of mayor of Reading.

C. B. Trevor Roper, esq, of Plasteg Park, Flint. Married.] At Faringdon, Mr. Thos. White, of shire-At Knutsford, Mr. Jacob Hume, of Middle Clanfield, to Miss Jane Gerring, of Northfield, Fa.

wich, to Miss Hughes, of that town. ringdon-At Hurley, Edm. Gardiner, esq. of Re- Died.] At Chester, Mr. Jacob Dutton-Mr. menham, to Anne, third daughter of John Mangles, Kelly- At Sandbach, 20, Miss Colclough, daughter esq-At Speen, Mr. Chittle, to Miss Hiscock, late of the late Mr. James Colclough, solicitór-Sudof Reading—At Padworth, Alfred Smith, esq. of denly, at Upton, near Chester, Mr. Dunbabbin-At Steanbridge House, Gloucestershire, to Miss Har- Colshaw, at an advanced age, Mr. Moses Tunni. riet Stephens, of Padworth-At Wargrave, Mr.

cliffe -At Stockport, Mr. Wm. Coppack, 91-Aų Wm. Pither, of Early, to Miss Whitfield, of the Macclesfield, Mr. Thomas Dickenson, former place.The Rev. Herbert Randolph, vicar of

CORNWALL. Marcham, to Mary, second daughter of the late Philip Doble Burridge, esq. of Stoke House, So- Married.] At Launceston, Mr. John Geak, to merset.

Miss Hawkey-Mr. Flamank, to Miss Rowe-At Died.] At Newbury, Anne, relict of Mr. S. Madron, Mr. Jennings, of Birmingham, to Mrs. Grigg At Hurley, Mrs. Eliza Maunde, relict of Freeman, of Penzance-At Callington, Mr. Webb, the Rev. J. Maunde, of Kenilworth, Warwick- of Tavistock, to Miss Pethick, of the same place shire, 62–At Cranhill Farm, Mr. Joseph King- -At Redruth, after a courtship of thirty years, At Wantage, Mrs. Sarah Chapman, 76, relict of Captain Richard Remfry, 63, to Miss Fanny Ed. George Chapman, esq.: her remains were deposit- wards, 61-At Liskeard, Lieut. Ede, R, N, to Miss ed in the family vault at Ampney Crucis, Glouces- Susan Adams, of that place. tershire-At Baylis, near Windsor, in her 70th Died.] At East Looe, Mrs. Edey, 78 --At Bodyear, the Dowager Marchioness of Thomond. Her min, Mr. Hender Mountsteven, 35—At Camelford, ladyship was niece to the late celebrated Sir Joshua Wm. Dinham, esq. 66, senior alderman of that boKeynolds-At Purley, Mrs. Ann Humphries, 82. rough—At Bashill, near Launceston, Mrs. Lane

At Castle Horneck, near Penzance, Marianne MaBUCKINGHAMSHIRE.

pleton, eldest daughter of the Rev. Geo, TreweekMarried.] At Great Marlow, Mr. Lovegrove, of

At Padstow, Mr. John Lodder, 60.
Slough, to Miss Hatch--At St. Pancras, Middlesex,
Mr. Charles Marins Hardy, of Newport Pagnell, to

CUMBERLAND.
Mrs. Lyncham, of London.

Married.] At Lanercost Abbey, Mr. ChristoDied.] At Amersham, Mrs. Rumsey, wife of pher Tweddell, of Askerton, to Miss Maughan --At James Rumsey, M. D.—Mr. George Bradford, town. Hayton, the Rev. Mr. Leach, to Mrs. Wills-Ati clerk of the borough of Buckingham : he was re- Carlisle, Mr. Robert Thomlinson, to Miss Catherine turning home from the Isle of Wight with his wife Williamson-Mr. Robert Scott, to Miss Mary and children, in a post-chaise, when his death Turnbull-Mr. Judah Middlemoor, to Miss Ann took place between Marlow and Amersham-At Pattison-Mr. Robert Moffat, to Miss Mary AtkinLittie Missenden, Thomas Wynne Williams, son of Mr. Thos. Williams, of Cannon-street-In London, Died.) In Carlisle, Mr. Francis Jollie, sen. 65, John Skottowe, esq. late of Chesham and of Not- late proprietor of the Carlisle Journal-Mr. Geo. ton Lodge, Wilts.

Roper, 42.

His death was occasioned by falling

down stairs, by which he dislocated his neck-Mr. CAMBRIDGESHIRE.

Geo. Williams, of Bowness, 56_At Cockermouth, Married.] At Cambridge, William Eve, esq. Mr. John Ashton, 51-Mrs. Snowden, 42-Mrs. fellow of Pembroke Hall, to Susanna, second daugh- Mary Watson, 45-At Keswick, Mrs. Ashburner, ter of Mr. Robert Chalk, of Sawbridgeworth, Herts 76~Mr. Wm. Jackson, 44-At Heskett-New-Mar. -Mr. Wm. Bird, to Miss Hannah Reynolds---Atket, Wm. Irving, esq. surgeon, At White Wisbech, Mr. John Curtis, to Miss Frances Hum- haven, Mr, John Dixon, 25 - At Aldley, near frey, of Guilford, Surrey--At Newmarket, Mr. De- Cleaton, Mr. Wm. Dixon, 28. lannoy, surgeon, to Miss Marshall. Died.] At Papworth Hall, Emma Morland

DERBYSHIRE. Cheere, daughter of C. M, Cheere, esq. M. P.-At

Married.) At Derby, Mr. Chambers, of MelBottisham, Mr. John King, 47-At Lynn, Mr. bourne, to Miss Eliza Humpston, of Derby ----Mr. Manby, surgeon, 73,

Greasley, of London, to Miss Sarah Mansfield, of

son,

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