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WHOEVER expects a Paraphrafe of Horace, or a faithful Copy of his genius, or manner of writing, in these ÎMITATIONS, will be much disappointed. Our Author uses the Roman Poet for little more than his canvas: And if the old design or colouring chance to suit his purpose, it is well: if not, he employs his own, without scruple or ceremony. Hence it is, he is so frequently ferious where Horace is in jest; and at ease where Horace is disturbed. In a word, he regulates his movements no further on his Original, than was necessary for his concurrence, in promoting their common plan of Reformation of manners.

Had it been his purpose merely to paraphrase an ancient Satirift he had hardly made choice of Horace ; with whom, as a Poet, he held little in common, besides a comprehensive knowledge of life and manners, and a certain curious felicity of expression, which consists in using the simplest language with dignity, and the most ornamented, with ease. For the rest, his harmony and strength of numbers, his force and splendor of colouring, his gravity and sublime of sentiment, would have rather led him to another model. Nor was his temper less unlike that of Horace, than his talents. What Horace would only smile at, Mr. Pope would treat with the grave severity of Persius : And what Mr. Pope would strike with the caustic lightning of Juvenal, Horace would content himself in turning into ridicule.

If it be asked then, why he took any body at all to imitaté, he has informed us in his Advertisement. To which we may add, that this sort of Imitations, which are of the nature of Parodies, adds reflected grace and splendor on original wit. Befides, he deem'd it more modest to give the name of Imitations to his Satires, than, like Despreaux, to give the name of Sama tires to Imitations.

Hmman mv, at dels

C:Grignion fculp

Safe from the Bar, the Pulpit and

the Throne, prouchit and shamd by Ridiculo alone

Epilo Jatire. Parta.

SAT I RE E 1.

P.T

To Mr. FOR TESCUE.
HERE are (I scarce can think it, but am

told) a There are, to whom my Satire seems too bold: Scarce to wise Peter complaisant enough, And something faid of Chartres much too rough. b The lines are weak, another's pleas'd to say, 5 Lord Fanny spins a thousand such a day. Tim'rous by nature, of the Rich in awe, 'I come to Council learned in the Law : You'll give me, like a friend both fage and free, Advice; and (as you use) without a Fee. 10 F. d I'd write no more.

P. Not write ? but then I think, * And for my soul I cannot sleep a wink.

NOTES. Ver.7. Tim'rous by nature, of the Rich in awe,] The delicacy of this does not so much lie in the ironical application of it to himself, as in its seriously characterifing the Person for whofe advice he applies.

VER, 12. Not write ? &c.] He has omitted the most humourous part of the answer,

Peream male, fi non Optimum erat, and has lost the grace, by not imitating the conciseness, of verum nequeo dormire.

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F.Harman inv. et del;

C.Grignion fcuh

Safe from the Bar,the Pulpit and the Throne, Yet touc

Couchi and shamd by Ridicule alone

Epito Jatires, Part2.

SAT I RE E I.

P.T

To Mr. FORTESCU E.
HERE are (I scarce can think it, but am

told) a There are, to whom my Satire seems too bold: Scarce to wise Peter complaisant enough, And something faid of Chartres much too rough. b The lines are weak, another's pleas'd to say, 5 Lord Fanny spins a thousand such a day. Tim'rous by nature, of the Rich in awe, 'I come to Council learned in the Law : You'll give me, like a friend both fage and free, Advice; and (as you use) without a Fee. 10 F.: I'd write no more.

P. Not write ? but then I think, * And for my soul I cannot sleep a wink.

NOTES. Ver. 7. Tim'rous by nature, of the Rich in awe,] The delicacy of this does not so much lie in the ironical application of it to himself, as in its seriously characterising the Person for whose advice he applies.

Ver. 12. Not write? &c.] He has omitted the most humourous part of the answer,

Peream male, fi non Optimum erat, and has lost the grace, by not imitating the conciseness, of verum nequeo dormire.

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