Topography and Natural History of Lofthouse and Its Neighborhood: With the Diary of a Naturalist and Rural Notes, Band 2

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Seite 23 - This guest of summer, The temple-haunting. martlet, does approve, By his lov'd mansionry, that the heaven's breath Smells wooingly here : no jutty, frieze, Buttress, nor coigne of vantage, but this bird Hath made his pendent bed, and procreant cradle : Where they most breed and haunt, I have observ'd, The air is delicate.
Seite 44 - Now this was the manner in former time in Israel concerning redeeming and concerning changing, for to confirm all things ; a man plucked off his shoe, and gave it to his neighbour : and this was a testimony in Israel.
Seite 86 - Cricket cry ; To see the feeding Bat glance through the wood ; To catch the distant falling of the flood ; While o'er the cliff th...
Seite 50 - O'er her now empty seat aloft were hung. With wicker rods we fenc'd her tomb around, To ward from man and beast the hallow'd ground, Lest her new grave the Parson's cattle raze, For both his horse and cow the church-yard graze.
Seite 31 - When the Danes were masters of England, and lorded it over the natives of the island, the inhabitants of a certain great city, grown weary of their slavery, had formed a secret conspiracy to murder their masters in one bloody night, and twelve men had undertaken to enter the...
Seite 37 - In the year 865, St. Swithin, bishop of Winchester, to which rank he was raised by king Ethelwolfe, the dane, dying, was canonized by the then pope. He was singular for his desire to be buried in the open churchyard, and not in the chancel of the minster, as was usual with other bishops, which request was complied with; but the monks, on his being canonized, taking it into their heads that it was disgraceful for the saint to lie in the...
Seite 29 - ... were an indispensable ingredient; and after supper was brought in, the wassail cup or wassail bowl, of which every one partook, by taking with a spoon, out of the ale, a roasted apple, and eating it, and then drinking the healths of the company out of the bowl, wishing them a merry Christmas and a happy new year.
Seite 174 - He spreads his sails, and bright is his sojourn, "Mid chalices with dews in every urn: All flying things a like delight have found— Where'er I gaze, to what new region turn, Ten thousand insects in the air abound, Flitting on glancing wings that yield a summer's sound.
Seite 127 - Any person who between the first day of March and the first day of August in any year...
Seite 28 - Mr. Beckwith relates in the Gentleman's Magazine, 1784, that " near Leeds, in Yorkshire, when he was a boy, it was customary for many families, on the twelfth eve of Christmas, to invite their relations, friends, and neighbours, to their houses, to play at cards, and to partake of a supper, of which minced pies were an indispensable ingredient; and after supper was brought in, the wassail cup or wassail bowl, of which every one partook, by taking with a spoon, out of the ale, a roasted apple, and...

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