Quips and Cranks

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Routledge, Warne, and Routledge, 1861 - 390 Seiten
 

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Seite 158 - So calm are we when passions are no more. For then we know how vain it was to boast Of fleeting things, so certain to be lost. Clouds of affection from our younger eyes Conceal that emptiness which age descries. The soul's dark cottage, battered and decayed, Lets in new light through chinks that Time has made: Stronger by weakness, wiser, men become As they draw near to their eternal home. Leaving the old, both worlds at once they view That stand upon the threshold of the new.
Seite 156 - A made a finer end, and went away an it had been any christom child. A parted even just between twelve and one, even at the turning o' the tide. For after I saw him fumble with the sheets, and play with flowers, and smile upon his fingers...
Seite 157 - The seas are quiet when the winds give o'er; So, calm are we when passions are no more! For then we know how vain it was to boast Of fleeting things, so certain to be lost.
Seite 130 - There's a lady — an earl's daughter, — she is proud and she is noble, And she treads the crimson carpet, and she breathes the perfumed air, And a kingly blood sends glances up her princely eye to trouble, And the shadow of a monarch's crown is softened in her hair.
Seite 287 - ... are good, and the same well sorted and ordered. 8. The better the voyce is, the meeter it is to honour and serve God therewith; and the voyce of man is chiefly to be employed to that ende. Omms Spiritus laudet Dominum. " Since singing is so good a thing, I wish all men would learn to sing.
Seite 286 - First it is a knowledge easily taught, and quickly learned ; where there is a good master and an apt scholar. " 2. The exercise of singing is delightful to Nature, and good to preserve the health of man.
Seite 287 - There is not any music of instruments whatsoever comparable to that which is made of the voices of men, where the voices are good, and the same well sorted and ordered.
Seite 137 - It is not that I love you less, Than when before your feet I lay; But to prevent the sad increase Of hopeless love, I keep away ! In vain, alas ! For every thing Which I have known belong to you, Your form does to my fancy bring; And makes my old wounds bleed anew...
Seite 136 - Why lingereth she to clothe her heart with love, delaying as the tender ash delays to clothe herself, when all the woods are green!
Seite 157 - When we for age could neither read nor write, The subject made us able to indite; The soul, with nobler resolutions decked, The body stooping, does herself erect. No mortal parts are requisite to raise Her that, unbodied, can her Maker praise. The seas are quiet when the winds give o'er; So, calm are we when passions are no more. For then we know how vain...

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