The history of England, from the invasion of Julius Cæsar to the revolution in 1688. 5 vols. [in 9. The plates are dated 1797 to 1806].

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Seite 213 - England, of the which most part was of people of small substance and of no value; whereof every of them pretended a voice equivalent, as to 'such elections to be made, with the most worthy knights and esquires dwelling within the same counties, whereby manslaughters, riots, batteries, and divisions among the gentlemen and other people of the same counties, shall very likely rise and be, unless convenient and due remedy be provided in this behalf...
Seite 182 - ... genuine sentiments. No less than thirty thousand persons are said to have daily lived at his board in the different manors and castles which he possessed in England; the military men, allured by his munificence and hospitality, as well as by his bravery, were zealously attached to his interests...
Seite 224 - Margaret, flying with her son into a forest, where she endeavoured to conceal herself, was beset, during the darkness of the night, by robbers, who, either ignorant or regardless of her quality, despoiled her of her rings and jewels, and treated her with the utmost indignity. The partition of this rich booty raised a quarrel among them ; and while their attention was thus engaged, she took the opportunity of making her escape with her son, into the thickest of the forest, where she wandered for some...
Seite 265 - ... a prince more splendid and showy than either prudent or virtuous ; brave, though cruel ; addicted to pleasure, though capable of activity in great emergencies ; and less fitted to prevent ills by wise precautions, than to remedy them, after they took place, by his vigor and enterprise.
Seite 212 - Fields ; great numbers of people surrounded them ; an harangue was pronounced to this mixed multitude, setting forth the title of Edward, and inveighing against the tyranny and usurpation of the rival family ; and the people were then asked whether they would have Henry of Lancaster for king. They unanimously exclaimed against the proposal. It was then demanded whether they would accept of Edward, eldest son of the late duke of York. They expressed their assent by loud and joyful acclamations...
Seite 7 - These doctrines, so agreeable to the populace, and so conformable to the ideas of primitive equality which are engraven in the hearts of all men...
Seite 234 - There is no part of English history since the Conquest so obscure, so uncertain, so little authentic or consistent, as that of the wars between the two roses...
Seite 146 - ... preparations. As the convoy approached the river, a sally was made by the garrison on the side of Beausse, to prevent the English general from sending any detachment to the other side. The provisions were peaceably embarked in boats, which the inhabitants of Orleans had sent to receive them.
Seite 382 - The prior was thought an holy man, and much reverenced in those days. He came to the king, and besought the king for Perkin's life only, leaving him otherwise to the king's discretion.
Seite 144 - ... which might distinguish him : that she offered him in the name of the supreme Creator, to raise the siege of Orleans, and conduct him to Rheims to be there crowned and anointed ; and on his expressing doubts of her mission, revealed to him, before some sworn confidants, a secret which was unknown to all the world...

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