John Cassell's illustrated history of England. The text, to the reign of Edward i by J.F. Smith; and from that period by W. Howitt, Band 6

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Seite 412 - Nothing could stop that astonishing infantry. No sudden burst of undisciplined valour, no nervous enthusiasm weakened the stability of their order, their flashing eyes were bent on the dark columns in their front, their measured tread shook the ground, their dreadful volleys swept away the head of every formation, their deafening shouts overpowered the dissonant cries that broke from all parts of the tumultuous crowd, as slowly and with a horrid carnage it was pushed by the incessant vigour of the...
Seite 99 - A Government in every country should be just like a Corporation,* and in this country it is made up of the landed interest which alone has a right to be represented.
Seite 172 - There is no if in the case," replied the Admiral : " that we shall succeed, is certain : who may live to tell the story is a very different question.
Seite 267 - Captains are to look to their particular Line as their rallying point. But, in case Signals can neither be seen or perfectly understood, no Captain can do very wrong if he places his Ship alongside that of an Enemy.
Seite 29 - How could we ever be so deceived in the character of the French nation as to think them capable of liberty ! wretches, who, after all their professions and boasts about liberty, and patriotism, and courage, and dying, and after taking oath after oath, at the very moment when their country is invaded and an enemy is marching through it unresisted, employ whole days in murdering women, and priests, and prisoners...
Seite 243 - ... consciences ? I consider it as no disgrace to make the first step. I have, I hope, sufficiently proved to the world, that I fear none of the chances of war : it, besides, presents nothing that I need to fear.
Seite 412 - Such a gallant line, issuing from the midst of the smoke, and rapidly separating itself from the confused and broken multitude, startled the enemy's masses, which were increasing and pressing onwards as to an assured victory ; they wavered, hesitated, and then vomiting forth a storm of fire, hastily endeavoured to enlarge their front, while a fearful discharge of grape from all their artillery whistled through the British ranks. Myers was killed...
Seite 208 - England," said the Moniteur, in an official tone, " shall have the treaty of Amiens, the whole treaty of Amiens, and nothing but the treaty of Amiens...
Seite 412 - ... by the incessant vigour of the attack to the farthest edge of the hill. In vain did the French reserves...
Seite 243 - France only a secondary object ; and does not your majesty already possess more than you know how to preserve ? If your majesty would but reflect, you must perceive that the war is without an object, without any presumable result to yourself. Alas ! what a melancholy prospect, to cause two nations to fight...

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