A sentimental journey France and Italy by L. Sterne. Also A tale of a tub by J. Swift

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Seite 346 - Last week I saw a woman flayed, and you will hardly believe how much it altered her person for the worse.
Seite 112 - Tis thou, thrice sweet and gracious goddess, addressing myself to Liberty, whom all in public or in private worship, whose taste is grateful, and ever will be so, till Nature herself shall change.
Seite 255 - What is that which some call land, but a fine coat faced with green ? or the sea, but a waistcoat of...
Seite 166 - Eternal fountain of our feeling! — 'tis here I trace thee, — and this is thy "divinity which stirs within me;" — not that. in some sad and sickening moments, " my soul shrinks back upon Herself, and startles at destruction...
Seite 318 - The most accomplished way of using books at present is two-fold: either first, to serve them as some men do lords, learn their titles exactly, and then brag of their acquaintance. Or secondly, which is indeed the choicer, the profounder, and politer method, to get a thorough insight into the index, by which the whole book is governed and turned, like fishes by the tail.
Seite 262 - ... and, according to the laudable custom, gave rise to that fashion. Upon which the brothers, consulting their father's will, to their great astonishment, found these words : Item, I charge and command my said three sons to wear no sort of silver fringe upon or about their said coats, &c., with a penalty, in case of disobedience, too long here to insert.
Seite 167 - Eternal fountain of our feelings! 'tis here I trace thee and this is thy "divinity which stirs within me" not, that in some sad and sickening moments, "my soul shrinks back upon herself, and startles at destruction" mere pomp of words! but that I feel some generous joys and generous cares beyond myself all comes from thee, great great SENSORIUM of the world! which vibrates, if a hair of our heads but falls upon the ground, in the remotest desert of thy creation...
Seite 114 - As I darkened the little light he had, he lifted up a hopeless eye towards the door — then cast it down — shook hjs head — and went on with his work of affliction.
Seite 255 - It is true, indeed, that these animals, which are vulgarly called suits of clothes or dresses, do according to certain compositions receive different appellations. If one of them be trimmed up with a gold chain, and a red gown, and a white rod, and a great horse, it is called a...
Seite 339 - Epicurus modestly hoped that one time or other, a certain fortuitous concourse of all men's opinions, after perpetual justlings, the sharp with the smooth, the light and the heavy, the round and the square, would, by certain clinamina, unite in the notions of atoms and void, as these did in the originals of all things. Cartesius reckoned to see, before he died, the sentiments of all philosophers, like so many lesser stars in his romantick system, wrapped and drawn within his own vortex.

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