System of Theoretical and Practical Chemistry ...

Cover
Kimber and Conrad, no. 93, Market-street., 1814
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 382 - ... a correction must be made for the general process, by subtracting a sum equal to their weight from the quantity of carbonate of lime obtained by precipitation from the muriatic acid. In arranging the products, the form should be in the order of the experiments by which they were procured.
Seite 387 - In supplying animal or vegetable manure, a temporary food only is provided for plants, which is in all cases exhausted by means of a certain number of crops ; but when a soil is rendered of the best possible constitution and texture, with regard to its earthy parts, its fertility may be considered as permanently established. It becomes capable of attracting a very large portion of vegetable nourishment from the atmosphere, and of producing its crops with comparatively little labour and expense.
Seite 382 - If any notable quantity of sulphate of lime (gypsum) existed in the soil, a white precipitate will gradually form in the fluid, and the weight of it will indicate the proportion. Phosphate of lime, if any exist, may be separated from the soil after the process for gypsum. Muriatic"' acid must be digested upon the soil, in quantity more than sufficient to saturate the soluble earths ; the solution must be evaporated, and water poured upon the solid matter. This fluid will dissolve the compounds of...
Seite 375 - It is of importance, that the specific gravity of a soil should be known, as it affords an indication of the quantity of animal and vegetable matter it contains ; these substances being always most abundant in the lighter soils. The other physical properties of soils should likewise be examined before the analysis is made, as they denote, to a certain extent, their composition, and serve as guides in directing the experiments. Thus siliceous soils are generally rough to the touch, and scratch glass...
Seite 376 - ... are themselves often highly absorbent and retentive, and in consequence influence the fertility of the land. The next process, however, after that of heating, should be their separation, which may be easily accomplished by the sieve, after the soil has been gently bruised in a mortar. The weights...
Seite 383 - When the experimenter is become acquainted with the use of the different instruments, the properties of the re-agents, and the relations between the external and chemical qualities of soils, he will seldom find it necessary to perform, in any one case, all the processes that have been described. When his soil, for instance, contains no notable proportion of calcareous matter, the action of the muriatic acid (7) may be omitted. In examining peat soils, he will principally have to attend to the operation...
Seite 387 - Fahrenheit. Plants and trees, the roots of which are fibrous and hard, and capable of penetrating deep into the earth, will vegetate to advantage in almost all common soils that are moderately dry, and do not contain a very great excess of vegetable matter.
Seite 384 - In the application of clay, sand, loam, marl, or chalk to lands, there are no particular chemical principles to be observed; but when quicklime is used, great care must be taken, that it is not obtained from the magnesian limestone; for in this case, as has been shown by Mr.
Seite 378 - The remaining fluid must be boiled for a quarter of an hour, when the magnesia, if any exist, will be precipitated from it, combined with carbonic acid, and its quantity is to be ascertained in the same manner as that of the carbonate of lime. If any minute proportion of alumina should, from peculiar circumstances, be dissolved by the acid, it will be ' found in the precipitate with the carbonate of lime, and it may be separated from it by boiling...
Seite 376 - ... calcareous, they will effervesce with acids ; if siliceous they will be sufficiently hard to scratch glass ; and if of the common aluminous class of stones, they will be soft, easily cut with a knife, and incapable of effervescing with acids. 3. The greater number of soils, besides gravel and stones, contain larger or...

Bibliografische Informationen