Flame of Separation

Cover
Insomniac Press, 07.11.2009 - 273 Seiten
The novel's hero is Akhenaton, Pharaoh of Egypt's Eighteenth Dynasty, who was the first ruler to introduce the idea of monotheism. As Rosemary Sullivan remarks in her biography of MacEwen, he was, like Julian, ''one more human being filled with the god-lust.'' Akhenaton's single-mindedness in his quest for his own brand of reason is a powerfully paradoxical distillation of the artistic temperament: originality, fertility and beauty set against death and despair and an inability to love. He's jolted out of his torpor by his student Susan Slater who experiences a sequence of paranormal visitations from a man named Gabriel at the Dancing Grasses conservancy. Could this be the same Gabriel, the charismatic shaman, whose spell Dexter fell under at seventeen? Why is he reappearing at Dancing Grasses, and why has he led Dexter and Susan to a corpse?
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Inhalt

Abschnitt 1
11
Abschnitt 2
19
Abschnitt 3
29
Abschnitt 4
39
Abschnitt 5
45
Abschnitt 6
57
Abschnitt 7
67
Abschnitt 8
81
Abschnitt 14
171
Abschnitt 15
179
Abschnitt 16
187
Abschnitt 17
197
Abschnitt 18
207
Abschnitt 19
215
Abschnitt 20
221
Abschnitt 21
239

Abschnitt 9
99
Abschnitt 10
113
Abschnitt 11
135
Abschnitt 12
145
Abschnitt 13
157
Abschnitt 22
249
Abschnitt 23
255
Abschnitt 24
263
Urheberrecht

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 12 - I thought pretty well at first, but afterwards it haunted and haunted me; and though I did not cry or take it to heart as some do, and as I think he would have done if I had died, yet I missed him all day long, and knew not till then how much I had loved him.
Seite 12 - I was lame-footed; and how when he died, though he had not been dead an hour, it seemed as if he had died a great while ago, such a distance there is betwixt life and death; and how I bore his death as I thought pretty well at first, but afterwards it haunted and haunted me; and though I did not cry or take it to heart as some do, and as I think he would have done if I had died...
Seite 7 - Chou again. But he did not know whether he was Chuang Chou who had dreamed that he was a butterfly, or whether he was a butterfly dreaming that he was Chuang Chou. Between Chuang Chou and the butterfly there must be some distinction. This is what is called the transformation of things.

Bibliografische Informationen