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CHRISTIAN SPECTATOR.

MDCCC LVII.

JANUARY-DECEMBER.

"JF GOD REVEAL ANY THING TO YOU BY ANY OTHER INSTRUMENT OF HIS, BE AS READY TO
RECEIVE IT AS EVER YOU WERE TO RECEIVE ANY TRUTII BY MY MINISTRY; FOR I AM VERILY
PERSUADEDI AM VERY CONFIDENT THE LORD HATH MORE TRUTH YET TO BREAK FORTH OUT
OF HIS HOLY WORD. POR MY PART I CANNOT SUFFICIENTLY BEWAIL THE CONDITION OF THE
REFORMED CHURCHES, WHO ARE COME TO A PERIOD IN RELIGION, AND WILL GO AT PRESENT
NO YURTBER THAN THE INSTRUMENTS OF THEIR FIRST REPORMATION. THE LUTHERANS CAXNOT
BE DRAWN TO GO BEYOND WHAT LUTIER SAW; WHATEVER PART OF HIS WILL OUR GOOD GOD
HAS IMPARTED AND REVEALED UNTO CALVIN, THEY WILL RATHER DIE THAN EMBRACE IT. AND
THE CALVINISTA YOU SEE STICK PAST WIERE THEY WERE LEFT BY THAT GREAT MAN OF GOD;
WHO YET SAW NOT ALL THINGS ! THIS IS A MISERY MUCH TO BE LAMENTED." - Robinson's
Advice to the Pilgrim Fathers.

VOL. VII.

LONDON:
HOULSTON & WRIGHT, 65, PATERNOSTER ROW.
EDINBURGH: ADAM AND CHARLES BLACK.

LONDON : COCKSBAW, TATES, AND ALEXANDER, PRINTERS, LUDGATE-HILL.

ANALYTICAL TABLE OF CONTENTS,

Address delivered to Students for the

FABLES

Ministry-Preaching, 405.

Book II. No. X., 512.

Africa, the Civilization of, 671.

Book II. No. XVIII., 585.

Fables, Christian, and Parables, 630.

Baxter, Richard, “His Poetry,666.

Modern, by Herr Pastor D.

Blue Books, a Reading from, 288.

Von Magdstein-

Bon Church, an Hour at, 692.

No. I. The Ass and the Wood

Boulogne, the Great Fêtes of, 655.

bine, 23.

Brontë, Charlotte, Life of, 305.

No. II. The Reward of Earnest-

Brother and Sister, 27.

Bunsen's God in History, 207.

No. III. 'Sancta Simplicitas' with

a ? 24,

Calvin, Letters of, 574.

No. IV. Pigsties for ever ! 24.

Caterpillars, Arts of, 765.

No. V. 187.

No. VI. ib.

Children, 607.

Church-rates refused, 627.

No. VII. ib.

Church, the, or “the Cause;" which ?

No, VIII. 188.

118.

Fancy Fair, a, 108.
Churchless, John Paul, or the Christian

Flowers, 498.

at large. Chap. I. 341.

German Theology ; the Westminster

Chap. II. 395.

Review, on, 298.

Conclusion, 459.

Good Minister of Jesus Christ, a, 191,

Cross and Crosses, the, 799.
Davidson, Dr., on Inspiration, 73.

Halifax, John, Gentleman, the Autho-
Debit and Credit, 786.

ress of, 350.

Devil and Demons, the-A chapter in Hamilton, Patrick, 554.

Scriptural Philology, 158.

Invalid's Visitor, an, 492.

East India Company, the Case against

concluded, 601.

the, 713.

Jephson ; or, Midnight and Dawn, 65,

FABLES of Gotthold Ephraim Lessing- 129, 193, 275, 360, 412, 479, 523,

Book I. 104.

591.

Book II. 218.

Book II. 443.

Kingsley's Two Years Ago, 244.

Law, the, abolished but not destroyed, Prayer-meetings; their Phraseology,
621.

163.
Lawes' Biographical History of Philo- Pulpit Plagiarisms, 436.
sophy, 567.

Pulse of the Church, the, 723.

Lights of England in the Dark Ages-

Alfred the Great, 43, 233.

Reader, to the, 805.

Ælfric, 426.

Religion in History, 11.

Literary Notices, 448.

Rigg, Mr., on Coleridgean Theology,
Livingstone's Travels, 753.

734.
MacDonald's Poems, 506.

Robert Robinson, once of Cambridge,

Miller, Hugh, 78.

473, 547, 615.

Modern German Pulpit, Specimens of

the, 141,

Saul of Tarsus, 773.

Missions, Record of Christian, 56, 120,

Stranger, a, in a Strange Land, 93.

188, 253, 322, 450, 514, 644, 814.

Stroll, a, into a Foreign Book-shop,

633.

Monthly Retrospect, 62, 124, 259, 325,

Stoughton's Congregational Lecture,

390, 454, 518, 587, 649.

316.

Nicholas, the Emperor, a German esti-

Societies, the Religious, 379.

mate of, 149,

Sun Pictures, 385

Sympathy, the Intercourse of, 38.
Orthodoxy, True, 295.
Outward Religion. A Chapter in Scrip- Theocles, 703.
tural Philology, 25.

Thoroughness in Early Instruction, 227.

Paley, William, 95, 169.

Reading, 265.

Patagonian Missions, 783.

Theology, French, 87.

Pictures and Painters, 540.

Tom Brown's School-days, 744.

Poetry:-Sunset, 54.

Two Hundred Years Ago, 221.

Longing, 56.

The Journey, 445.

What we want, 34.

Poetry, the, of the New Year, 1.

Wishes for the Common Birthday, 796.

Poetry, New, and New Poems, 373. Work and Play, or, the Laws of Reli-

the Wisdom of, 685.

gion on Amusement, 329.

THE MONTHLY

CHRISTIAN SPECTATOR.

JANUARY, 1857.

The Poetry of the New Dear.

CHARLES LAMB says, 'Every man hath two birthdays; two, at least, in every year, which set him upon revolving the lapse of time as it affects his mortal duration. The one is that which, in an especial manner, he termeth his. In the gradual desuetude of old observances, this custom of solemnizing our proper birthday hath nearly passed away, or is left to children, who reflect nothing at all about the matter, nor understand anything beyond the cake and orange. But the birth of a new year is of an interest too wide to be pretermitted by king or cobbler. No one ever regarded the first of January with indifference. It is that from which all date their time, and count upon what is left. It is the nativity of our common Adam.'

I interrupt Elia to make two remarks. First-he commits a bachelor's mistake-(Oh! let us speak softly of this noblest of celibates ! Gentle reader, learn, if you know it not, the pitiful story of the single blessedness of this gentle creature)—when he says children think nothing of their birthdays beyond the cake or orange. The visitor, the friend, nay, the brother, may fancy so, if he have, as most likely he has, forgotten his own childhood. But I appeal to Fruitful Vines who read this, and Spouses whose Olive-branches are growing into inquisitiveness, whether, at such sacred moment as the lull of a Sunday evening twilight, a child doth not sometimes put questions concerning himself and his advent which awaken thoughts that do lie too deep for tears ?' Second—I wish to ask, in passing, why all human intellects seem to have hit upon the king and the cobbler as the natural types of antithetic condition in life? Unless my memory fails me, this idea runs through literatures where the alliteration is lost; so that it is no answer to say that king suggests kobbler as peer

does peasant. Let us take up with Elia again : ‘Of all sound of bells (bells, the music nighest bordering upon heaven), most solemn and touching is the peal

VOL. VII.

B

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