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BRAUNLICH, A. F., The Confusion of the Indirect Question and the

Relative Clause in Latin

60

BUCK, CARL D., Studies in Greek Noun-Formation: Dental Termina-

tions I. 4.

75

CALHOUN, GEORGE MILLER, AcamapTupía, mapaypačń, and the Law of
Archinus.

169

CONRAD, CLINTON C., The Rôle of the Cook in Plautus’ Curculio 389

COOPER, LANE, The Fifth Form of 'Discovery' in the Poetics of Aris-

totle

251

FRANK, TENNEY, The Economic Life of an Ancient City

225

Some Economic Data from CIL, Volume XV .

155

HYSKELL, IRA D., Some Rare Meanings of excludo

401

JONES, ROGER MILLER, Chalcidius and Neo-Platonism .

194

KNAPP, CHARLES, A Phase of the Development of Prose Writing among

the Romans

138

LINDSAY, W. M., Bird-Names in Latin Glossaries (with notes by D'Arcy

Wentworth Thompson)

1

LINFORTH, IVAN M., oi afavariGOVTES

23

McDANIEL, WALTON BROOKS, The Pupula Duplex and Other Tokens of
an "Evil Eye" in the Light of Ophthalmology .

335

MARTIN, HENRY M., Remarks on the First Ode of Horace

186

MERRILL, ELMER TRUESDELL, Some Remarks on Cases of Treason in

the Roman Commonwealth

34

POSTGATE, J. P., Textual Notes on Phaedrus

262

PRENTICE, WILLIAM K., Sappho

347

PRESCOTT, HENRY W., The Antecedents of Hellenistic Comedy. III 113

PRESTON, KEITH, Aspects of Autumn in Roman Poetry.

272

Radin, Max, The Date of Composition of Caesar's Gallic War

283

ROBBINS, FRANK EGLESTON, The Cost to Athens of Her Second Empire 361

SCOTT, JOHN A., Non-Odyssean Words Found in the Iliad

53

SHEWAN, A., Scheria-Corcyra.

321

SMITH, CHARLES FORSTER, Personification in Thucydides .

241

STEELE, R. B., Some Features of the Later Histories of Alexander . 301

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410

NOTES AND DISCUSSIONS
ABBOTT, FRANK FROST, Note on the Fourth Catilinarian Oration
CALHOUN, GEORGE MILLER, The Status of Callistratus in the Litigation
over the Estate of Conon (Demosthenes), xlviii. 31, 43 ff.

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DEWITT, N. W., A Semantic Study of licio
Fay, EDWIN W., Note on Greek oxvdá, ‘Shadow'
JOHNSON, A. C., The Archon Lysitheides .
LAIRD, A. G., Note on Plato's Republic T. 562 A
MACURDY, GRACE H., The Derivation and Significance of the Greek

Word for “Cock”

PEASE, ARTHUR STANLEY, Cicero De Divinatione i. 80

POSTGATE, J. P., On Cicero De Divinatione i. 80.

SHOREY, PAUL, Emendation of Scholia on Pindar Pyth. 1. 20

Note on Iliad xvi. 823–28

Democritus on the New Education

Note on Diogenes Laertius ix. 108

93

91

BOOK REVIEWS

(See Index)

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Latin glossaries are still a terra irredenta for scholars. But, thanks to Professor Goetz, we can now descry the main highways, and soon, if volunteer research is available, the whole region will be ours and each part of it minutely surveyed. When that time comes, the apographs in Goetz’s Corpus Glossariorum Latinorum (C.G.L.) will be replaced by editions of the glossaries, and Goetz's Thesaurus Glossarum will become the mere apparatus criticus of a small Dictionary of Glosses, a dictionary which will be owned and freely used by every teacher of Latin.

Yielding to the pleasure of anticipation, I venture here to offer a specimen of this ideal) dictionary and, in order to get the cooperation of Professor D'Arcy Thompson, choose the glosses with bird-names for my rash and premature attempt. The evidence for each detail will be found in the Thesaurus Glossarum and my article in the July number of the Classical Quarterly of this year (with the other articles there mentioned).

There are three great storehouses from which most Latin glossaries took most of their items:

I. (PHILOX.) the Philoxenus Glossary. Not the mangled epitome printed in C.G.L. II, but the full Latin-Greek glossary compiled by some monastery-teacher in Italy. Its bird-names would come from (1) Festus' epitome of Verrius Flaccus (who used augural manuals, etc.); (2) Charisius' lists of nouns, e.g. (Idiomata Generis), (CLASSICAL PHILOLOGY XIII, January, 1918) 1

nouns whose gender differs in Latin and Greek, such as (Gram. Lat. I. 552, 11) luscinius: anduv, et luscinia ut Horatius (Sat. ii. 3. 245) dicit .... mergus: aidula .

.... turtur:Tpuráv, turdus: Kixha. (Possibly similar lists in other grammarians were used too; but our text of Charisius is very imperfect, depending on a single MS written at Bobbio about the year 700); (3) marginal notes in the monasterylibrary MSS of Virgil, the Satirists (including Sulpicia ? including Martial ?), the Bible (Itala, i.e. pre-Vulgate, version).

II. (ABOL.) the Abolita Glossary, compiled by some monasteryteacher in Spain at the end( ?) of the seventh century. It contained fuller and more numerous items than those printed (within squar brackets) in C.G.L. IV 4–198. Its bird-names would come from (1) Festus, (2) brief and worthless marginal notes in the monastery MS of Virgil, etc.

III. (ABSTR.) the Abstrusa Glossary, perhaps better called Abstrusa Major to distinguish it from the reduced version printed in C.G.L. IV 3–197. The compiler, a seventh-century monasteryteacher in France, got his materials from (1) variorum Virgil Scholia (of Donatus, etc.), (2) brief marginal notes in a MS of the Bible (Itala).

The following list mentions only the archetype gloss and ignores the derivatives. It omits the items in the Liber Glossarum culled from Isidore's Etymologies; the items of the Nonius Glossary (C.G.L. V 637–51); the items found only in late MSS of the 'omnium gatherum' type, such as Cass. 90 (C.G.L. V 559–83), Vat. 1468 (C.G.L. V 490-519); and, of course, Scaliger's heterogeneous and 'doctored' collection (C.G.L. V 589–614).

acalanthis : cardellus, alibi carduelis, avis vepribus adsueta (V 161, 26-27) ABSTR. (a Virgil gloss from Geo. 3, 338 litoraque alcyonem resonant, acalanthida dumi. Cf. Schol. per dumos vero acalanthis, quam alii lusciniam esse volunt, alii vero carduelim, quae spinis et carduis pascitur, etc.). acceia: áokalaon (II 13, 16) PHILOX. (an Itala gloss, from Levit. 11, 17 abominamini . . . . et bubonem et catirecten et acceiam. In Vulg. ibin). acceptor:iépaß, accipiter:iépaß (II 12, 57; 13, 11) PHILOX. (a Charisius gloss, from Gram. Lat. I 98, 9 acceptor et accipiter. With, perhaps, a Virgil gloss;

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