The Looker-on: A Periodical Paper, Band 4

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Robinson, 1795
 

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Seite 289 - Must helpless man, in ignorance sedate, Roll darkling down the torrent of his fate? Must no dislike alarm, no wishes rise, No cries invoke the mercies of the skies? Inquirer, cease; petitions yet remain Which Heaven may hear, nor deem Religion vain.
Seite 239 - ... of the table. Corporeal temperance is mental luxury ; and the Mufe "is fooner inebriated with the limpid beverage of the pure fountain, than with the richeft...
Seite 218 - They had taken up their lodging •in the hut of a poor fithermar., where they had refolved to pafs, regardlefs of the bleak barrennefs of this ftormy and defolate abode, the remaining blifsful hours of their lives. But the machinations of fortune, their old enemy, were now to recommence ; and it was decreed by the frowning...
Seite 71 - And now, what is the just consequence from all these things? Not that reason is no judge of what is offered to us as being of divine revelation. For this would be to infer that we are unable to judge of any thing, because we are unable to judge of all things.
Seite 289 - Enquirer, ceafe, petitions yet remain, Which heav'n may hear, nor deem religion vain. Still raife for good the fupplicating voice, But leave to heav'n the meafure and the choice. Safe in his pow'r, whofe eyes difcern afar The fecret ambufh of a fpecious pray'r.
Seite 69 - And thus we see, that the only question concerning the truth of Christianity is, whether it be a real revelation ; not whether it be attended with every circumstance which we should have looked for...
Seite 50 - it 's my turn to speak : If I let you alone, you'll go on for a week. Since you say that with you he's as light as a feather, Pray keep him, or come to bed always together ; For the moment you're off...
Seite 112 - ... compared to which, the verge of a precipice is a stable station ; may rightfully snatch the wreath from the conqueror and the martyr ; may boast that he exposes himself to hazards, from which he might fly to the cannon's mouth as a refuge or a relaxation ! Sir, let us now be told no more of the infamy of the rope-dancer.
Seite 12 - ... supported by nothing but that mental majesty which no traitors can wrest from her, and that mournful solace derived from the prospect of an ignominious death ? Let the gates of the city be shut on its own abominations, and let the horrid transaction be covered with its own gloom ! let no eye witness it that has ever dropped a tear ; let no ear hear it that is not deaf to the voice of nature ; " let that day be darkness ; let not God regard it from above, neither let the light shine upon it ;...
Seite 239 - ... experiences, when repofing on the tomb of his friend, or when bathing the cold urn of his departed wife, with tears of delicious forrow. Alas ! the worldling, taught, from his...

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