Putnam's Monthly, Band 10

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G.P. Putnam & Company, 1857
 

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Seite 101 - He has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred rights of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating and carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere, or to incur miserable death in their transportation thither. This piratical warfare, the opprobrium of infidel powers, is the warfare of the Christian king of Great Britain. Determined to keep open a market where men should be bought and sold, he has prostituted his negative...
Seite 103 - And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are of the gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with His wrath? Indeed I tremble for my country...
Seite 396 - Oh that I had in the wilderness a lodging place of wayfaring men; That I might leave my people, and go from them ! For they be all adulterers, an assembly of treacherous men.
Seite 109 - Whilst love and terror laid the tiles. Earth proudly wears the Parthenon, As the best gem upon her zone, And Morning opes with haste her lids To gaze upon the Pyramids; O'er England's abbeys bends the sky, As on its friends, with kindred eye; For out of Thought's interior sphere These wonders rose to upper air; 40 And Nature gladly gave them place. Adopted them into her race, And granted them an equal date With Andes and with Ararat.
Seite 294 - Best of thy kind, adieu ! The frantic blow that laid thee low This heart shall ever rue...
Seite 125 - They let the hair of their heads grow to a great length ; but as the men make a great show with heads of hair that are none of their own, the women, who they say have very fine heads of hair, tie it up in a knot, and cover it from being seen. The women look like angels, and would be more beautiful than the sun, were it not for little black spots that are apt to break out in their faces, and sometimes rise in very odd figures. I have observed that those little blemishes wear off very soon ; but when...
Seite 104 - You seem, in pages 84 and 148, to consider the judges as the ultimate arbiters of all constitutional questions — a very dangerous doctrine indeed, and one which would place us under the despotism of an oligarchy. Our judges are as honest as other men, and not more so. They have, with others, the same passions for party, for power, and the privilege of their corps.
Seite 104 - A strict observance of the written laws is doubtless one of the high duties of a good citizen : but it is not the highest. The laws of necessity, of self-preservation, of saving our country when in danger, are of higher obligation. To lose our country by a scrupulous adherence to written law, would be to lose the law itself, with life, liberty, property, and all those who are enjoying them with us; thus absurdly sacrificing the end to the means.
Seite 291 - Llewellyn homeward hied ; when, near the portal seat, his truant Gelert he espied, bounding his lord to greet. But when he gained the castle door, aghast the chieftain stood ; the hound was smeared with gouts...
Seite 291 - Twas only at Llewellyn's board the faithful Gelert fed ; he watched, he served, he cheered his lord, and sentinel'd his bed. In sooth, he was a peerless hound, the gift of royal John ; but now no Gelert could be found, and all the chase rode on. And now, as over rocks and dells the gallant chidings rise, all Snowdon's craggy chaos yells with many mingled cries.

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