Introduction to Shakespeare

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1901 - 136 Seiten
 

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Seite 31 - Master Jonson (like the former) was built far higher in learning ; solid, but slow in his performances. Shakespeare, with the English man of war, lesser in bulk, but lighter in sailing, could turn with all tides, tack about, and take advantage of all winds, by the quickness of his wit and invention.
Seite 64 - Now these, her princes, are come home again, Come the three corners of the world in arms, And we shall shock them : naught shall make us rue, If England to itself do rest but true.
Seite 18 - Yes, trust them not: for there is an upstart crow beautified with our feathers, that with his tiger's heart, wrapt in a player's hide, supposes he is as well able to bombast out a blank verse as the best of you; and being an absolute Johannes factotum, is in his own conceit the only Shake-scene in a country.
Seite 93 - To judge therefore of Shakespeare by Aristotle's rules is like trying a man by the laws of one country, who acted under those of another.
Seite 10 - No sweet aspersion shall the heavens let fall To make this contract grow ; but barren hate, Sour-eyed disdain and discord shall bestrew The union of your bed with weeds so loathly That you shall hate it both : therefore take heed, As Hymen's lamps shall light you.
Seite 134 - Advanced, and made a constellation there! Shine forth, thou Star of Poets, and with rage Or influence, chide or cheer the drooping stage, Which, since thy flight from hence, hath mourned like night, And despairs day, but for thy volume's light.
Seite 132 - Soul of the age! The applause, delight, the wonder of our stage! My Shakespeare, rise! I will not lodge thee by Chaucer, or Spenser, or bid Beaumont lie A little further, to make thee a room: Thou are a monument without a tomb, And art alive still while thy book doth live And we have wits to read and praise to give.
Seite 97 - This therefore is the praise of Shakespeare, that his drama is the mirror of life; that he who has mazed his imagination, in following the phantoms which other writers raise up before him, may here be cured of his delirious ecstacies, by reading human sentiments in human language, by scenes from which a hermit may estimate the transactions of the world, and a confessor predict the progress of the passions.
Seite 12 - He had, by a misfortune common enough to young fellows, fallen into ill company ; and amongst them, some that made a frequent practice of deer-stealing, engaged him more than once in robbing a park that belonged to Sir Thomas Lucy, of Charlecote, near Stratford. For this he was prosecuted by that gentleman, as he thought, somewhat too severely ; and in order to revenge that ill usage, he made a ballad upon him.
Seite 129 - We have but collected them, and done an office to the dead, to procure his orphans guardians; without ambition either of self-profit or fame ; only to keep the memory of so worthy a friend and fellow alive as was our Shakespeare, by humble ofier of his plays to your most noble patronage.

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