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I say Love,

Streaming tears that never stint,2 Inconstant Love,

Like pearl-drops from a flint, Sets men's senses far at odds.

Fell by course 3 from his eyes, Some swear Love,

That one another's place supplies; Smooth-faced Love,

Thus he grieved in every part, Is sweetest sweet that men can have: Tears of blood fell from his heart, I say Love,

When he left his pretty boy, Sour Love,

Father's sorrow, father's joy. Makes virtue yield as beauty's slave. A bitter sweet, a folly worst of all, Weep not, my wanton, smile upon my That forceth wisdom to be folly's thrall.

knee,

When thou art old there's grief enough Love is sweet,

for thee. Wherein sweet?

The wanton smiled, father wept, In fading pleasures that do pain.

Mother cried, baby leapt; Beauty sweet:

More he crowed, more he cried, Is that sweet

Nature could not sorrow hide: That yieldeth sorrow for a gain?

He must go, he must kiss If Love's sweet,

Child and mother, baby bliss, Herein sweet,

For he left his pretty boy, That minutes' joys are monthly woes: Father's sorrow, father's joy. 'Tis not sweet,

Weep not, my wanton, smile upon my That is sweet

knee. Nowhere but where repentance grows. When thou art old there's grief enough for Then love who list, if beauty be so sour;

thee. Labor for me, Love rest in prince's bower.

SEPHESTIA'S SONG TO HER CHILD

THE SHEPHERD'S WIFE'S SONG

Weep not, my wanton, smile upon my

knee,
When thou art old there's grief enough

for thee.
Mother's wag, pretty boy,
Father's sorrow, father's joy;
When thy father first did see
Such a boy by him and me,
He was glad, I was woe,
Fortune changed made him so,
When he left his pretty boy,
Last his sorrow, first his joy.

Ah, what is love? It is a pretty thing,
As sweet unto a shepherd as a king;

And sweeter too:
For kings have cares that wait upon a

crown,
And cares can make the sweetest love to

frown. Ah then, ah then, If country loves such sweet desires do

gain, What lady would not love a shepherd

swain?

Weep not, my wanton, smile upon my

knee, When thou art old there's grief enough

His flocks are folded, he comes home at

night,
As merry as a king in his delight;

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for thee.

And merrier too:

* playful one

stop

Sin a stream

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For kings bethink them what the state If country loves such sweet desires do require,

gain, Where shepherds careless carol by the fire. What lady would not love a shepherd Ah then, ah then,

swain? If country loves such sweet desires do gain,

Thus with his wife he spends the year, as What lady would not love a shepherd

blithe swain?

As doth the king at every tide or sithe;?

And blither too: He kisseth first, then sits as blithe to

For kings have wars and broils to take eat

in hand His cream and curds as doth the king his

When shepherds laugh and love upon the meat;

land. And blither too:

Ah then, ah then, For kings have often fears when they do

If country loves such sweet desires do sup,

gain, Where shepherds dread no poison in their What lady would not love a shepherd cup.

swain? Ah then, ah then, If country loves such sweet desires do gain,

CONTENT What lady would not love a shepherd swain?

Sweet are the thoughts that savour of

content; To bed he goes, as wanton then, I ween,

The quiet mind is richer than a crown; As is a king in dalliance with a queen;

Sweet are the nights in careless slumber More wanton too:

spent; For kings have many griefs affects to The poor estate scorns Fortune's angry

frown: move, Where shepherds have no greater grief Such sweet content, such minds, such than love.

sleep, such bliss, Ah then, ah then,

Beggars enjoy, when princes oft do miss. If country loves such sweet desires do gain,

The homely house that harbours quiet What lady would not love a shepherd

rest, swain?

The cottage that affords no pride nor

care, Upon his couch of straw he sleeps as The mean, that 'grees with country music sound,

best, As doth the king upon his beds of down; The sweet consort of mirth and modest More sounder too:

fare. For cares cause kings full oft their sleep Obscured life sets down a type of to spill,

bliss: Where weary shepherds lie and snort A mind content both crown and kingdom their fill.

is. Ah then, ah then,

1 time

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When icicles hang by the wall,

And Dick the shepherd blows his nail, And Tom bears logs into the hall,

And milk comes frozen home in pail, When blood is nipped and ways be foul, Then nightly sings the staring owl,

"Tu-whit, tu-whoo!" A merry note, While greasy Joan doth keel the pot. When all aloud the wind doth blow,

And coughing drowns the parson's saw,
And birds sit brooding in the snow,
And Marian's nose looks red and

raw;
When roasted crabs' hiss in the bowl,
Then nightly sings the staring owl,

“Tu-whit, tu-whoo!” A merry note, While greasy Joan doth keel the pot.

The shepherd swains shall dance and sing
For thy delight each May morning:
If these delights thy mind may move,
Then live with me and be my love.

FRANCIS DAVISON (1575?-1619?)

MADRIGAL

TO CUPID

From Two GENTLEMEN OF VERONA Love, if a god thou art, Then evermore thou must

Who is Silvia? what is she, Be merciful and just.

That all our swains commend her? If thou be just, О wherefore doth thy Holy, fair, and wise is she; dart

The heaven such grace did lend her, Wound mine alone, and not my Lady's That she might admired be. heart?

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Between the acres of the rye

With a hey and a ho, and a hey nonino! These pretty country folks would lie: In the spring time, the only pretty ring

time, When birds do sing hey ding a ding:

Sweet lovers love the Spring.

love

Then come kiss me, sweet and twenty,

Youth's a stuff will not endure.

This carol they began that hour,

With a hey and a ho, and a hey nonino! How that a life was but a flower In the spring time, the only pretty ring

time,
When birds do sing hey ding a ding:

Sweet lovers love the Spring.
And therefore take the present time

With a hey and a ho, and a hey nonino!
For love is crowned with the prime
In the spring time, the only pretty ring

time, When birds do sing hey ding a ding:

Sweet lovers love the Spring.

From MEASURE FOR MEASURE Take, O take those lips away,

That so sweetly were forsworn; And those eyes, the break of day,

Lights that do mislead the morn: But my kisses bring again;

Bring again; Seals of love, but sealed in vain,

Sealed in vain!

From CYMBELINE

From MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING

Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more!

Men were deceivers ever.
One foot in sea and one on shore,

To one thing constant never:
Then sigh not so, but let them go,

And be you blithe and bonny, Converting all your sounds of woe

Into Hey nonny, nonny! Sing no more ditties, sing no moe

Of dumps so dull and heavy! The fraud of men were ever so,

Since summer first was leafy: Then sigh not so, but let them go,

And be you blithe and bonny, Converting all your sounds of woe

Into Hey nonny, nonny!

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Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temper- 6

ate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds

of May, And summer's lease hath all too short b

a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven

shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed; And every fair from fair sometime de

clines, By chance, or nature's changing course

untrimmed;

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