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CONTENTS.

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PREFACE, ..

. .. 3

HINTS ON THE Modes of PRACTICE IN THE USE OF THIS VOLUME, 9

INTRODUCTORY OBSERVATIONS ON THE STUDY OF ELOcution, 13

The Elocution of the Pulpit. By the Rev. Dr. Edwards A. Park, 14

The Study of Elocution an important part of the Preparation re-

quired by the Public Duties of the Ministry. By the Rev.

Edward N. Kirk, . . . . . . . . 21

Elocution, as a department of Preparatory Study in Theology, 29

EFFECTS OF MANNER IN THE ELOCUTION OF THE PULPIT, . 56

Animation and Dulness, . . . . . . . . 56

Earnestness and Apathy, . . . . . . . . 61

Force, Feebleness, . . . . . . . . . 69

Vehemence, Violence, . . . . . . . . 70

Gentleness, Spirit, Tameness,

Boldness, Timidity, . .

Harshness, Amenity, . . . . . . . . . 74

The Cultivation of Force, . . . . . . . 75

Modes of Cultivating Force,

• 75

Modes of Subduing Excessive Vehemence, . . . . 76

Freedom; Constraint, Reserve, . ,

Variety, Monotony, . . . .

81

Mannerism, Adaptation, Appropriateness,, . . . . 84

Individuality of Manner, . . . . . . . . 91

Dignity, Familiarity, . . . . . . . . . 95

Formality, Primness, Rigidity, , . . . . . 99

Propriety of Manner, . .

. 104

Warmth of Manner, , , , , , , , , 107

Serenity of Manner, . . . . . . . . . 113

True and Natural Manner, . . . . . . . 116

Refinement and Gracefulness, , .

, 120

False Taste, Artificial Style, . .

122

Adaptation of Manner to the Different Parts of a Discourse, . 124

Manner in Devotion, . . . . . . . . 126

PRINCIPLES OF ELOCUTION, . . . . . . . 130

The Caltivation of the Voice : its Capability, . . . . 130

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Middle Pitch, . . . . . . . . . . 190

Low Pitch, . . . . . . . . . . 192

Lowest Pitch, . ..

196

High Pitch, . . . . . . . . . . 198

EXERCISES in INFLECTION,

202

Empassioned Inflection, ..

202

Vivid or Earnest Inflection, .

Moderate Inflection, . . . . . . . . . 207

Slight Inflection, . .

208

** Monotone, " . .

209

EXERCISES IN "MOVEMENT,” . . . . . . . 211

“Slowest Movement,”

· · · · · · · 212

“Slow Movement," . . . . . . . . 214

“Moderate Movement,” ..

222

“Lively Movement," .

229

EXERCISES in RHYTHM,"

236

Verse, or Metrical Accent. .

238

Prose “Rhythm," . .

240

EXERCISES IN EMPIASIS, .

242

Empassioned Emphasis, .

243

Unempassioned Emphasis, .

EXERCISES IN “ EXPRESSION," . . . . . . . 244

Awe, . . . . . . . . . . . 244

Awe and Fear, . . . . . . . . . . 245

Awe, Solemnity, and Tranquillity,

245

Solemnity and Reverence, . . . . . . . . 247

Praise, . . . . . . .

247

Deep and uncontrolled Grief,

249

Deep and subdued Grief, . . . . . . . 251

Indignation, . . . . . . . . . . 252

Denunciation, . . . . . . . . . . 254

Tenderness, . . . . . . . . . . 256

Patience and Contrition, . . . . . . 259

Regret, Repentance, and Shame, .

260

Remorse, Self-reproach, Horror, and Despair, . . . 261

Joy,. . . . . . . . . . . . . 263

Happiness, . . . . . . . . . . 265

Composure Serenity, and Complacency,

EXERCISES IN“ VARIATION," . . . . . . . 274

“Invocation of Light.” — Milton, . . . . . . 275

"Soliloquy of Satan.” — Milton, . .

278

"The Dying Christian.” — Pope, .

283

" The Enterprise of the Pilgrim Fathers of N. E.” — E. Everett, 285

READING OF THE SCRIPTURES, . . . . . . 291

Narrative Passages, . . . . . . . . . 295

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Examples in Familiar Style, . . . . . . . 296

Examples in “ Middle” Style, . . . . . . . 298

Examples in Elevated Style,. .

299

Didactic Passages, . .

.

. . . . . . . . 303

Examples in Oral and Parabolic Style, . . . . . 304

Examples from the Epistles, . . . . . . 306

Passages from the Prophetic Writings, . . . . . 308

Lyric Passages, . . . . . .

311

Tur READING OF Ilymns, . . . . . . . 312

Examples of Solemnity and Awe, . . . . . . 319

Grandeur, Majesty, and Power, . . 320

Repose, Tranquillity, and Serenity, . . . 324

Joy, Praise, and Triumph, . . . . 325

Pathos, Entreaty, and Supplication, . . . 333

Varicd - Expression,” . . . . . 337

Didactic Sentiment, . . . . . . 342

THE PRINCIPLES OF GESTURE, . .

346

The Attitude of the Body, required for Public Speaking, . . 354

The Character of Oratorical Action, . . . . . 359

MISCELLANEOUS EXERCISES IN READING AND SPEAKING, . 369

English Oratory. - Addison, . . . . . .

369

Pulpit Eloquence of England. - Sydney Smith,

. . 371

Eloquence of the Pulpit. -- John Quincy Adams, . . . 374

The Fatal Falsehood. - Mrs. Opie, . . . . . . 375

Musings on the Grave. — Washington Irving, . . . . 378

The Grave. - James Montgomery, . . . .

380

The Gallican Church, at the Period of the Revolution. - Croly, 382

Night. - James Montgomery, . . . . . . . 384

The Land of Beulah. - G. B. Cheever, . . . . . 385

Life's Companions. - Charles Mackay, . . . . . 388

Henry Martyn.– Macaulay, . . . . .

390

" Ora atque Labora!” - Albert Pike, .

394

The Field of Battle. — Robert Hall, . . . . . 395

"Not on the Battle Field.” – John Pierpont, . . . . 397

Religious Principle the Vital Element of Poetry. Carlyle, . 399

Emblems. - James Montgomery, . . . . . . . 403

The Sun's Eclipse (July 8, 1842). -- Horace Smith, . . 404

On a Survey of the Heavens, before Daybreak.-H. K. White, 407

The Crowded Street. - W. C. Bryant, . . . . . 409

Robert Hall. - Anon., .. . . . . . . . 410

The Millennium Era. – S. T. Coleridge, . . . . 412

PRELIMINARY HINTS

ON MODES OF PERSONAL TRAINING,

IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE USE OF THIS VOLUME.

INDIVIDUALS who have not convenient access to instruction, and are desirous of prosecuting the study and practice of elocution, as a matter of self-cultivation, may be aided by the following suggestions.

1. The preliminary condition to success in the cultivation of any branch of practical oratory, is a healthy condition of the bodily frame. El. ocution, as the exterior part of eloquence, is altogether dependent on the vigor and flexibility of the muscular system. Flaccid, rigid, and clumsy muscles render expression by voice and action impracticable. Muscular energy and pliancy demand habits of free exposure to the open air, and the vigorous use of the arms and limbs, in daily exertions of adequate force.

No man can be effectively eloquent without energy; and the attaining of energy is, to the student and the sedentary man, a thing compare atively arduous. Several hours — not one, merely — of every day, are due to the renovation of the body; and the student who tries to evade this condition, although he may do well, apparently, for a few years, usually sinks into debility, or contracts a decided – perhaps a fatal bronchial affection. The sedentary man who is, at the same time, & public speaker, needs a double allowance of air end exercise, to counteract the injurious tendency of the union of two modes of life naturally incompatible. The nervous excitation, and the cerebral exhileration, arising from continued intellectual action, by the deceptive inspiration which they impart, — often lead the student to slight physical ex. ercise, as a thing unnecessary. A few years, sometimes even a few months, are sufficient to undeceive the individual, and disclose all the accumulation of unsuspected injury to which he had been subjecting himself. The student is ever prone to forget that the body is a machine designed for action, and one which he is bound to keep in use, and so to keep in repair. - under a penalty not less severe than is attached to a desecration. The statistics of elocution, however, if faithfully record. ed, would not show a result, usually, of one sound voice in ten, anong young men who are adieted to sedentary and studious habits.

An individual who wishes to acquire or retain the power of speaking or reading with true effect, must, in the first instance, be willing to assign a considerable portion of every day to invigorating exercise and exposure.

2. It is, farther, an indispensable prerequisite to effective elocution that the student accustom himself to activity, as a habit both of body and mind. Expression, in elocutionary forms, is action: it is a thing utterly

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