The History of Henry the Fifth: King of England, Lord of Ireland, and Heir of France

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D. Appleton, 1866 - 473 Seiten
"Henry V (16 September 1386? 31 August 1422[1][2]) was King of England from 1413 until his death at the age of 35 in 1422. He was the second English monarch who came from the House of Lancaster."--Wikipedia.
 

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Seite 290 - ... in going against you, to demand the reason of your refusal, and to exhort you, in the name of the merciful bowels of Jesus Christ, to do us justice, and to say to you that which He teaches : Friend, give me that which thou owest me.
Seite 214 - And, on our arrival there, we found no person; so we caused the whole place to be set on fire, and many other houses around it, belonging to his tenants. And then we went straight to his other place of Glyndourdy, to seek for him there. There we burnt a fine lodge in his park, and the whole country round; and we remained there all that night.
Seite 207 - ... be; and to give me advice as to what may seem to them best- to be done for the safeguard of the aforesaid parts. And, agreeably to their advice, I will do all I possibly can, to resist the rebels and save the English country, as God shall give me grace, ever trusting in your high majesty to remember my poor estate, and that I have not the means of continuing here without the adoption of some other measures for my maintenance, and that the expenses are insupportable to me.
Seite 212 - I will not contend. And to inform you fully of all that has been done, I send you a person worthy of credit therein, my faithful servant the bearer of this letter, who was at the engagement, and performed his duty well, as he has always done. And such amends has God ordained you for the burning of four houses in your aforesaid town.
Seite 230 - Whereunto they answered that they had not offended, but according to the law had done their best in stinting debate and maintaining of the peace ; upon which answer the King remitted all his ire and dismissed them.
Seite 205 - I have taken this very highest pleasure and entire delight at the news, of which you were pleased to certify me. First, the speedy arrival of my very dear cousin, the Earl of Westmoreland, and of William Clifford, to your highness ; and secondly, the arrival of the despatches from your adversary of Scotland and other great men of his kingdom, by virtue of your safe-conduct, for the good of both the kingdoms : which God of his mercy grant! and that you may accomplish...
Seite 306 - God, and to avoid the shedding of human blood, we have many times and in many ways, sued and sought for peace, and have not been able to obtain it ; and notwithstanding this, our desire of having it increaseth more and more. And well considering that our wars occasion the death of men, the desolation of countries, the lamentations of women and children, and so many evils in the general, as every good Christian ought to mourn and have pity on them, and especially ourself, whom this matter chiefly...
Seite 446 - Why then, God's soldier be he ! Had I as many sons as I have hairs, I would not wish them to a fairer death; And so his knell is knoll'd.
Seite 214 - This person offered five hundred pounds for his ransom, to save his life, and to pay that sum within two weeks. Nevertheless, that was not accepted, and he was put to death ; and several of his companions, who were taken the same day, met with the same fate. We then proceeded to the commore 1 of Edernyon, in Merionethshire, and there laid waste a fine and populous country.
Seite 72 - He loudly maintained his innocence against his accuser; and, bending his knee, said to the king: "My dear lord, with your leave, if I may answer your cousin, I say that Henry of Lancaster is a liar ; and in what he has said, and would say, of me, lies like a false traitor as he is.

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