The history of England, by D. Hume, continued by T. Smollett, and to the 23rd year of the reign of queen Victoria by E. Farr and E.H. Nolan. 3 vols. [in 12 pt.].

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Seite 113 - it was perfectly justifiable to use all the means that God and nature put into our hands!" I AM ASTONISHED ! — shocked ! to hear such principles confessed — to hear them avowed in this House, or in this country ; principles equally unconstitutional, inhuman, and unchristian ! My lords, I did not intend to have encroached again upon your attention; but I cannot repress my indignation.
Seite 121 - In God's name, if it is absolutely necessary to declare either for peace or war, and the former cannot be preserved with honour, why is not the latter commenced without hesitation ? I am not, I confess, well informed of the resources of this kingdom ; but I trust it has still sufficient to maintain its just rights, though I know them not. But, my Lords, any state is better than despair. Let us at least make one effort ; and if we must fall, let us fall like men...
Seite 121 - Scottish inroads, and the Norman conquest; that has stood the threatened invasion of the Spanish armada, now fall prostrate before the House of Bourbon ? Surely, my Lords, this nation is no longer what it was ! Shall a people, that seventeen years ago was the terror of the world, now stoop so low as to tell its ancient inveterate enemy, take all we have, only give us peace ? It is impossible ! ' I wage war with no man, or set of men.
Seite 104 - You have been three years teaching them the art of war : they are apt scholars, and I will venture to tell your Lordships, that the American gentry will make officers enough, fit to command the troops of all the European powers. What you have sent there, are too many to make peace — too few to make war. If you conquer them, what then ? You cannot make them respect you ; you cannot make them wear your cloth : you will plant an invincible hatred in their breasts against you. Coming from the stock...
Seite 121 - I rejoice that the grave has not closed upon me ; that I am still alive to lift up my voice against the dismemberment of this ancient and most noble monarchy.
Seite 163 - Oh, inestimable rights, that have taken from us our rank among nations, our importance abroad, and our happiness at home...
Seite 177 - Majesty upon any Bill or other proceeding depending in either House of Parliament, with a view to influence the votes of the members, is a high crime and misdemeanour, derogatory to the honour of the Crown, a breach of the fundamental privileges of Parliament, and subversive of the Constitution of this country'.
Seite 216 - I impeach him in the name of the people of India, whose laws, rights and liberties he has subverted; whose properties he has destroyed; whose country he has laid waste and desolate. I impeach him in the name and by virtue of those eternal laws of justice which he has violated. I impeach him in the name of human nature itself, which he has cruelly outraged, injured and oppressed, in both sexes, in every age, rank, situation, and condition of life.
Seite 216 - hath it with all confidence been ordered by the Commons of Great Britain, that I impeach Warren Hastings of high crimes and misdemeanors. I impeach him in the name of the Commons' House of Parliament, whose trust he has betrayed.
Seite 166 - That the House would consider as enemies to his majesty and the country all those who should advise, or by any means attempt, the further prosecution of offensive war on the Continent of North America.

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