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distinctions. The further relations of the same subject to each of the arts considered separately are unfolded in three essays, namely:

Poetry as a Representative Art;

Music as a Representative Art, printed for convenience in the volume treating of Rhythm and Harmony; and

Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture as Representative Arts.

The Genesis of Art-Form traces the derivation of the elements of form from their sources in mind or matter and the development, according to mental and physical requirements, of these elements so as to produce, when combined, the different art-forms. The volume directs attention to the characteristics of form essential to æsthetic effects in all the arts. The characteristics essential to each of the arts considered in itself, are discussed in two volumes completing the series, namely:

Rhythm and Harmony in Poetry and Music; and

Proportion and Harmony of Line and Color in Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture,

The author wishes to express his indebtedness to Messrs. D. Appleton & Co., Houghton, Mifflin & Co., and others, for their kind permission to insert in this work certain entire poems, of which they hold the copyrights.

Altered from the Preface to the First Edition,

PRINCETON, N. J., November, 1899.

PAGE

PAGE

Poetic Analogues, 51–Loudness and Softness, Strength and Weak-

ness, Great and Slight Weight as represented by Long or Short,

Accented or Unaccented Syllables, 52.

VI.

FORCE AS THE SOURCE AND INTERPRETER OF POETIC

MEASURES

57-81

Gradations of Force or Stress, representing Reflective Influence

exerted on Instinctive Tendency, 57—What is represented by the

the Different kinds of Elocutionary Stress, 58—Why Elocutionary

Stress corresponds to Poetic Measure, 59—Classification of Eng-

lish Poetic Measures, and their Classic Analogues, 60mWhat is

represented by Initial Double Measure, 62--Its Classic Form, 63

-By Terminal Double Measure, 65–Why used in Our Hymns,

67-Its Classic Form, 67–Triple Measures ; Median, 68-Its

Classic Form, 70-Initial Triple Measure, 70_Could also be termed

Compound Measure, corresponding to Compound Stress, 70-Its

Classic Form, 72—Its Use in Greek Pæonics, 72-In Pathos,

corresponding to Tremulous Stress, 73— Terminal Triple Measure,

74-Can correspond to Thorough Stress, 74-Its Classic Form,

75—Blending of Different Triple Measures, 75–Of Triple and

Double Measures to prevent Monotony, 76-Quadruple Measures,

Di-initial and Di-terminal, 77—Blending of all kinds of Measures

to represent Movements, 79.

VII.

ELOCUTIONARY AND POETIC REGULARITY or FORCE, 82–88

Regularity of Force, combining its Instinctive with Reflective

Tendencies, and representing Emotive Influence, 82—Abrupt and

Smooth Force, as used in Elocution, and Irregular and Regular

Accentuation corresponding to them in Poetry, 82-Abruptness in

short and long Lines, 85-Imitative Effects, 87.

VIII.

ELOCUTIONARY AND POETIC PITCH-TUNES OF VERSE, 89-102

Elements entering into the Tunes of Verse: Pitch and Quality, 89

- Pitch representing Reflective Tendency or Intellectual Motive,

90-On its Instinctive Side by High and Low Key, 91-What each

represents, 91-On its Reflective, by Rising, Falling, and Circum-

flex Movements, 92—What each represents, 92—When Influences

from both Sides express Emotive Colorings, by Melody, 94—

What Different Melodies represent, 94—Pitch as used in Poetry,

95—Which was formerly chanted, 95–And has Tunes at Present,

96—Shades of Pitch in Speech as Numerous as, and more Delicate

than, in Song, 96—Scientific Proof that Short Vowels usually sug-

gest a High Key, and Long, a Low Key, 97—Light, Gay, Lively

Ideas represented by the Former, 99-Serious, Grave, Dignified by

the Latter, 100.

IX.

POETIC PITCH-RISING AND FALLING TONES 103-114

Correspondence between Elocutionary Inflections or Intonations and

certain Arrangements of Verse-Harmony produced by Sounds of

Vowels and Consonants combined, 103—Effects of Rising Move-

ments produced by Lines beginning without Accents and ending

with them, 104–Of falling Movements, by Lines beginning with

Accents and ending without them, 105–Of Circumflex Movements,

by Combinations of both Arrangements, 106—What the Marks of

Accent indicated to the Greeks, and how they read them in their

Poetry, 107—Illustrations of Ideas represented by Verse arranged

to give Effects of Rising, Falling, and Circumflex Movements, 109

- Movements of Verse in Narration and Pathos, 114.

X.

POETIC PITCH_MELODY AND RHYME

• 115-125

Variety and Monotony in Elocution and Poetry represent less or

more Control over Self and the Subject, 115—True Significance of

Alliteration, Assonance, etc., 116–Rhyme introduces Element of

Sameness, 118-Increases effects of Versification, of Unity, of

Poetic Form, of Emphasis of all kinds, of Regularity of Move-

ment, of Rapidity of Thought, 118—Results of Changing the

Order of the Occurrence of Rhymes in Tennyson's “In Memo-

riam," 122—Blank Verse admitting of Great Variety Preferable

for Long Productions, 124.

XI.

ELOCUTIONARY AND POETIC QUALITY

126-135

Quality represents the Emotive Nature of the Soul as influencing

and influenced by both Instinctive and Reflective Tendencies,

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