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PRINCIPAL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH, HISTORIOGRAPHER
TO HIS MAJESTY FOR SCOTLAND, AND MEMBER OF THE

ROYAL ACADEMY OF HISTORY AT MADRID,

THE TENTH EDITION,
In which is included the Posthumous Volume,

CONTAINING

THE HISTORY OF VIRGINIA, TO THE YEAR 1688;

AND OF NEW ENGLAND, TO THE YEAR 1652.

IN FOUR VOLUMES.

VOL. III.

LONDON:

Printed by A. Strahan, Printers-Street,
For A. STRAĦAN; T. CADELL and W. Davies, Strand;

and E. BALFOUR, Edinburgh.

1803

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THE

HISTORY

OF

A M E R I.CA.

BOOK V. continued.

А

V.

1520.

of

FTER a prosperous voyage, Narvaez landed BOOK

his men without opposition near St. Juan de Ullua. Three foldiers, whom Cortes had sent The proto search for mines in that district, immediately Narvaez. joined him. By this accident, he not only re

April. ceived information concerning the progress and situation of Cortes, but as these soldiers had made some progress in the knowledge of the Mexican language, he acquired interpreters, by whole means he was enabled to hold fome in. tercourse with the people of the country. But, according to the low cunning of deserters, they framed their intelligence with more attention to what they thought would be agreeable, than to what they knew to be true; and represented the situation of Cortes to be so desperate, and

the

VOL. III.

B

V.

1520.

BOO K the disaffection of his followers to be so general,

as increased the natural confidence and presumption of Narvaez. His first operation, however, might have taught him not to rely on their partial accounts. Having sent to summon the governor of Vera Cruz to surrender, Guevara, a priest whom he employed in that service, made the requisition with fuch infolence, that Sandoval, an officer of high spirit, and zealously attached to Cortes, instead of complying with his demands, seized him and his attendants, and sent them in chains to Mexico.

Cortes deeply alarmed.

CORTEŚ received them not like enemies, but as friends, and condemning the severity of Sandoval, set them immediately.' at liberty. By this well-timed clemency, seconded by carefses and presents, he gained their confidence, and drew from them such particulars concerning the force and intentions of Narvaez, as gave him a view of the impending danger in its full extent. He had not to contend now with half. naked Indians, no match for him in war, and still more inferior in the arts of policy, but to take the field against an army in courage and martial discipline equal to his own, in number far fuperior, acting under the fanction of royal authority, and commanded by an officer of known bravery. He was informed that Nar

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