Annual Meeting of the American Institute of Instruction, Band 59

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American Institute of Instruction, 1888
List of members included in each volume, beginning with 1891.
 

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Seite 20 - I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided ; and that is the lamp of experience. I know of no way of judging of the future but by the past.
Seite 42 - These all died in faith, not having received the promises, but having seen them afar off, and were persuaded of them, and embraced them and confessed that they were strangers and pilgrims on the earth. For they that say such things declare plainly that they seek a country.
Seite 35 - It serves always to distract the Public Councils, and enfeeble the Public Administration. It agitates the Community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms; kindles the animosity of one part against another, foments occasionally riot and insurrection.
Seite 35 - ... the alternate triumphs of different parties, to make the public administration the mirror of the ill-concerted and incongruous projects of faction, rather than the organ of consistent and wholesome plans, digested by common counsels, and modified by mutual interests.
Seite 14 - At Lincoln Cathedral there is a beautiful painted window, which was made by an apprentice out of the pieces of glass which had been rejected by his master. It is so far superior to every other in the church, that, according to the tradition the vanquished artist killed himself from mortification.
Seite 23 - There is one mind common to all individual men. Every man is an inlet to the same and to all of the same.
Seite 99 - I do remember well the hour which burst My spirit's sleep : a fresh May-dawn it was, When I walked forth upon the glittering grass, And wept, I knew not why : until there rose, From the near schoolroom, voices, that alas ! Were but one echo from a world of woes — The harsh and grating strife of tyrants and of foes.
Seite 18 - ... exhibited in miniature. He relates no fact, he attributes no expression to his characters, which is not authenticated by sufficient testimony. But by judicious selection, rejection, and arrangement, he gives to truth those attractions which have been usurped by fiction. In his narrative, a due subordination is observed ; some transactions are prominent, others retire.
Seite 42 - Therefore sprang there even of one, and him as good as dead, so many as the stars of the sky in multitude, and as the sand which is by the sea shore innumerable.
Seite 184 - ... the inclination of the axis of the earth to the plane of the ecliptic, and partly to the different positions in which a spectator is placed in different zones of the globe.

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