Hooker. Field. Donne. Thomas Fuller. Henry More. Heinrich. Hackett. Jeremy Taylor. The Pilgrim's progress. John Smith

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Seite 148 - I say the truth in Christ, I lie not, my conscience also bearing me witness in the Holy Ghost, that I have great heaviness and continual sorrow in my heart. For I could wish that myself were accursed from Christ for my brethren, my kinsmen according to the flesh...
Seite 252 - He that despised Moses' law died without mercy under two or three witnesses : of how much sorer punishment, suppose ye, shall he be thought worthy, who hath trodden under foot the Son of God, and hath counted the Blood of the Covenant, wherewith He was sanctified, an unholy thing, and hath done despite unto the Spirit of grace ? For we know Him that hath said, Vengeance belongeth unto Me, I will recompense, saith the Lord.
Seite 97 - The ashes of an oak in the chimney, are no epitaph- of that oak, to tell me how high or how large that was : it tells me not what flocks it sheltered while it stood, nor what men it hurt when it fell. The dust of great persons' graves is speechless too ; it says nothing, it distinguishes nothing.
Seite 111 - Therefore let all the house of Israel know assuredly, that God hath made that same Jesus, whom ye have crucified, both Lord and Christ.
Seite 14 - EVERY man is born an Aristotelian or a Platonist. I do not think it possible that any one born an Aristotelian can become a Platonist ; and I am sure no born Platonist can ever change into an Aristotelian. They are the two classes of men, beside which it is next to impossible to conceive a third. The one considers reason a quality, or attribute ; the other considers it a power. I believe that Aristotle never could get to understand what Plato meant by an idea.
Seite 97 - ... graves is speechless too, it says nothing, it distinguishes nothing : as soon the dust of a wretch whom thou wouldest not, as of a prince whom thou couldest not look upon, will trouble thine eyes, if the wind blow it thither ; and when a whirl-wind hath blown the dust of the churchyard into the church, and the man sweeps out the dust of the church into the churchyard, who will undertake to sift those dusts again, and to pronounce, This is the patrician, this is the noble flour, and this the yeomanly,...
Seite 82 - Now therefore go, and I will be with thy mouth, and teach thee what thou shalt say. And he said, O my Lord, send, I pray thee, by the hand of him whom thou wilt send.
Seite 10 - That which doth assign unto each thing the kind, that which doth moderate the force and power, that which doth appoint the form and measure, of working, the same we term a law.
Seite 16 - ... them. With us it is otherwise. For although the beauties, riches, honours, sciences, virtues, and perfections of all men living, were in the present possession of one; yet somewhat beyond and above all this, there would still be sought and earnestly thirsted for. So that Nature, even in this life, doth plainly claim and call for a more divine perfection than either of these two that have been mentioned.

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