Guy's Hospital Gazette, Band 19

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Guy's Hospital., 1905
 

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Seite 434 - But the long habit of living indisposeth us for dying ; when avarice makes us the sport of death, when even David grew politically cruel, and Solomon could hardly be said to be the wisest of men.
Seite 412 - Were I to study Physic or rather Medicine again, I feel it would not make the least difference in my Poetry; when the mind is in its infancy a Bias is in reality a Bias, but when we have acquired more strength, a Bias becomes no Bias.
Seite 370 - Is there one word which may serve as a rule of practice for all one's life ? " The Master said, " Is not RECIPROCITY such a word ? What you do not want done to yourself, do not do to others.
Seite 338 - ... the other day, during the lecture, there came a sunbeam into the room, and with it a whole troop of creatures floating in the ray; and I was off with them to Oberon and fairy-land.
Seite 517 - Came home, there perishing near 10,000 poor creatures weekly ; however, I went all along the city and suburbs from Kent Street to St. James's, a dismal passage, and dangerous to see so many coffins exposed in the streets, now thin of people ; the shops shut up, and all in mournful silence, not knowing whose turn might be next.
Seite 332 - ... formed circles hand in hand, and appearing to have lost all control over their senses, continued dancing, regardless of the bystanders, for hours together, in wild delirium, until at length they fell to the ground in a state of exhaustion. They then complained of extreme oppression, and groaned as if in the agonies of death, until they were swathed in clothes bound tightly round their waists ; upon which they again recovered, and remained free from complaint until the next attack.
Seite 518 - London bridge, on the same side, be many fair inns, for receipt of travellers, by these signs, the Spurre, Christopher, Bull, Queene's Head, Tabarde, George, Hart, Kinge's Head, &c. Amongst the which, the most ancient • is the Tabard, so called of the sign, which, as we now term it, is of a jacket, or sleeveless coat, whole before, open on both sides, with a square collar, winged at the shoulders ; a stately garment of old time, commonly worn of noblemen...
Seite 199 - Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel. Butter and honey shall he eat, that he may know to refuse the evil, and choose the good.
Seite 365 - ... at in history, he will be thought to have shared as little as any in the defects of the period, and most notably exhibited the virtues of the race. Generosity he has, such as is possible to those who...
Seite 518 - ... of noblemen and others, both at home and abroad in the wars, but then (to wit in the wars) their arms embroidered, or otherwise depict upon them, that every man by his coat of arms might be known from others : but now these tabards are only worn by the heralds, and be called their coats of arms in service...

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