Discoveries, 1641: Conversations with William Drummond of Hawthornden, 1619

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John Lane, The Bodley Head Limited, 1923 - 106 Seiten
 

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Seite 24 - I loved the man, and do honour his memory on this side idolatry as much as any. He was, indeed, honest, and of an open and free nature ; had an excellent phantasy, brave notions, and gentle expressions, wherein he flowed with that facility that sometimes it was necessary he should be stopped.
Seite 25 - His wit was in his own power, would the rule of it had been so too. Many times he fell into those things, could not escape laughter : as when he said in the person of Caesar, one speaking to him,
Seite 24 - I remember, the players have often mentioned it as an honour to Shakespeare, that in his writing (whatsoever he penned) he never blotted out a line. My answer hath been, Would he had blotted a thousand.
Seite 62 - ... examine the weight of either. Then take care, in placing and ranking both matter and words, that the composition be comely; and to do this with diligence and often.
Seite 89 - The third requisite in our poet, or maker, is imitation: to be able to convert the substance or riches of another poet to his own use. To make choice of one excellent man above the rest, and so to follow him till he grow very he, or so like him as the copy may be mistaken for the principal.
Seite 70 - Words borrowed of antiquity do lend a kind of majesty to style, and are not without their delight sometimes ; for they have the authority of years, and out of their intermission do win themselves a kind of gracelike newness.
Seite 29 - The true artificer will not run away from Nature as he were afraid of her, or depart from life and the likeness of truth, but speak to the capacity of his hearers. And though his language differ from the vulgar somewhat, it shall not fly from all humanity, with the Tamerlanes and Tamer-chams of the late age, which had nothing in them but the scenical strutting and furious vociferation to warrant them to the ignorant gapers.
Seite 1 - He cursed Petrarch for redacting verses to sonnets, which he said were like that tyrant's bed, where some who were too short were racked, others too long cut short.
Seite 32 - Yet there happened in my time one noble speaker who was full of gravity in his speaking; his language, where he could spare or pass by a jest, was nobly censorious. No man ever spake more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered.
Seite 34 - But his learned and able, though unfortunate, successor is he who hath filled up all numbers, and performed that in our tongue, which may be compared, or preferred, either to insolent Greece or haughty Rome. In short, within his view and about his times were all the wits born, that could honour a language or help study. Now things daily fall, wits grow downward, and eloquence grows backward; so that he may be named, and stand, as the mark and acme of our language.

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