Miscellaneous Writings and Letters of Thomas Cranmer

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Regent College Publishing, 2001 - 612 Seiten

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Speech in Convocation to the Clergy 1547
13
A Confutation of Unwritten Verities 1
18
De unctione pedum p 537 De cognitione angelorum p 236
33
A Collection of Tenets from the Canon Law
69
Substance of a Speech on General Councils
76
Corrections of the Institution by Henry VIII with Cranmers Annotations
83
Questions and Answers concerning the Sacraments c 1540
115
Speech at the Coronation of Edward VI Feb 20 1547
126
De vera religione et superstitione p 67 Quod nomine sensualitatis inferior rationis
244
De religiosis p 119 Pro purgatorio p
263
De votis p 137 Contra purgatorium p
334
Articles to be inquired into at his Visitation 1548
344
De virginitate et de votis castitatis p 141 Subversio illarum rationum quæ pro con
357
LETTERS 220
439
Vindication of the Defence in Answer to Bishop Gardiner and Dr Smith 1551
455
AIPENDIX
460

Homily of Faith
135
Homily of Good Works annexed unto Faith
141
Questions concerning some Abuses of the Mass
150
Articles of Inquiry 1550
161
Notes for a Homily against Rebellion
188
Notes on Justification
203
Examination before Brokes 1555
212
Appeal at his Degradation
224
De sepultura mortuorum p 160 peccata dimittuntur nec medium est ullum
505
A Letter sent to all licensed Preachers from the Council May
512
Three Letters from the Lords of the Council in Windsor to
520
Mandates by Edward VI for Subscription to the Articles of 1552
532
Processus contra Thomam Cranmer
541
All the Submissions and Recantations of Thomas Cranmer
563
Collection of Extracts from the Canon
576
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Über den Autor (2001)

Thomas Cranmer, the English prelate and archbishop of Canterbury, was born in Aslacton in Nottinghamshire. In 1503 he was sent to study at Jesus College, Cambridge University, where he obtained a fellowship. Cranmer took holy orders in 1523. Six years later, he left Cambridge because of the plague and went to Waltham, where he came to the attention of King Henry VIII because of his suggestion that Henry submit the question of his divorce from Catherine of Aragon to a debate by universities throughout Christian Europe. Cranmer subsequently became a counsel in this suit and was then appointed royal chaplain and archdeacon of Taunton. In 1533, he was made archbishop of Canterbury and soon after declared Catherine's marriage to Henry null and void. Throughout the remainder of Henry's reign, he was subservient to the will of the king, annulling Henry's marriage to Anne Boleyn, divorcing him from Anne of Cleves, and informing the king of Catherine Howard's premarital affairs. Under Henry VIII, Cranmer had been slowly drifting into Protestantism. While serving as archbishop under Edward VI, Cranmer shaped the doctrinal and liturgical transformation of the Church of England, placing the English Bible in churches and, in 1552, revising the Book of Common Prayer. Shortly after the Roman Catholic queen Mary I assumed the throne, however, Cranmer was tried and convicted of treason and heresy and condemned to be burned at the stake. Before being put to death, he recanted his errors and retracted all he had written. In addition to The Book of Common Prayer, Cranmer wrote a number of other works, including the Reformatio Legum Ecclesiasticarum (1571) and A Defence of the Doctrine of the Sacrament (1550).

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