The countries of the world, Band 3;Band 77

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Seite 80 - Insects are the curse of tropical climates. The bete rouge lays the foundation of a tremendous ulcer. In a moment you are covered with ticks. Chigoes bury themselves in your flesh, and hatch a large colony of young Chigoes in a few hours. They will not live together, but every Chigoe sets up a separate ulcer, and has his own private portion of pus. Flies get entry into your mouth, into your eyes, into your nose ; you eat flies, drink flies, and breathe flies. Lizards, Cockroaches, and Snakes get...
Seite 27 - At this season the leaves of the mahogany tree are invariably of a yellow-reddish hue, and an eye accustomed to this kind of exercise, can, at a great distance, discern the places where the wood is most abundant. He now descends, and to such places his steps are directed...
Seite 82 - An insect with eleven legs is swimming in your teacup, a nondescript with nine wings is struggling in the small beer, or a caterpillar with several dozen eyes in his belly is hastening over the bread and butter ! All nature is alive, and seems to be gathering all her entomological hosts to eat yon up, as you are standing, out of your coat, waistcoat, and breeches.
Seite 99 - OH England is a pleasant place for them that's rich and high, But England is a cruel place for such poor folks as I ; And such a port for mariners I ne'er shall see again As the pleasant Isle of Aves, beside the Spanish main. There were forty craft in Aves that were both swift and stout, All furnished well with small arms and cannons round about ; And a thousand men in Aves made laws so fair and free To choose their valiant captains and obey them loyally. Thence we sailed against the Spaniard with...
Seite 28 - Each gang then separates its own cutting by the mark on the ends of the logs, and forms them into large rafts, in which state they are brought down to the wharves of the proprietors, where they are taken out of the water, and undergo a second process of the axe to make the surface smooth. The ends, which...
Seite 85 - ... cubic feet. On this basis we find that the Mississippi would carry down an equivalent mass of matter in 785,000 years. The rate of denudation in certain river basins varies from one foot in 700 years to one foot in 12,000 years. Assuming that similar rates would apply to the Andes, they would be denuded away in from 9 to 156 million years. In all probability, much less than 9 million would suffice.
Seite 3 - ... insalubrious. The trade winds blow from the northeast; and the moisture with which they are saturated, condensed on the elevated parts of the continent, flows down toward the Atlantic. The Pacific slope is therefore comparatively dry and healthful, as are also the elevated regions of the interior.
Seite 130 - The noise of this terrible flood is heard five or six miles, and increases as it approaches. Presently you see a liquid promontory twelve or fifteen feet high, followed by another, and another, and sometimes by a fourth. These watery mountains spread across the whole channel, and advance with a prodigious rapidity, rending and crushing everything in their way. Immense trees are instantly uprooted by it, and sometimes whole tracts of land are swept away/
Seite 27 - To such a spot are his steps directed ; and without compass or other guide than what his recollection affords, he never fails to reach the exact point at which he aims. On some occasions no ordinary stratagem is necessary to be resorted to by the huntsman, to prevent others from availing themselves of the advantage of his discoveries ; for if his steps be traced by those who may be engaged in the same pursuit, which is a very common occurrence, all his ingenuity must be exerted to beguile them from...
Seite 28 - June, when the rivers swell to an immense height ; the logs then float down a distance of 200 miles, being followed by the gang in pitpans (a kind of flat-bottomed canoe) to disengage them from the branches of the overhanging trees, until they are stopped by a boom placed in some situation convenient to the mouth of the river. Each gang then separates its own...

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