Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, Band 13

Cover
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 149 - Though I, once gone, to all the world must die : The earth can yield me but a common grave, "When you entombed in men's eyes shall lie. Your monument shall be my gentle verse, Which eyes not yet created shall o'er-read ; And tongues to be your being shall rehearse, When all the breathers of this world are dead ; You still shall live (such virtue hath my pen,) Where breath most breathes, even in the mouths of men.
Seite 143 - IN going to my naked bed, as one that would have slept, I heard a wife sing to her child, that long before had wept. She sighed sore, and sang full sweet, to bring the babe to rest, That would not cease, but cried still, in sucking at her breast.
Seite 94 - Sae rantingly, sae wantonly, Sae dauntingly gaed he; He played a spring and danced it round Beneath
Seite 144 - Glaucon, musical training is a more potent instrument than any other, because rhythm and harmony find their way into the inward places of the soul...
Seite 144 - ... and also because he who has received this true education of the inner being will most shrewdly perceive omissions or faults in art and nature, and with a true taste, while he praises and rejoices over and receives into his soul the good, and becomes noble and good, he will justly blame and hate the bad, now in the days of his youth, even before he is able to know the reason why; and when reason comes he will recognize and salute the friend with whom his education has made him long familiar.
Seite 141 - He is nature's fresh picture newly drawn in oil which time and much handling dims and defaces. His soul is yet a white paper unscribbled with observations of the world, wherewith, at length, it becomes a blurred note book. He is purely happy because he knows no evil, nor hath made means by sin to be acquainted with misery.
Seite 207 - Growing on's cheek (but none knows how), With these, the crystal of his brow, And then the dimple of his chin; All these did my Campaspe win. At last he set her both his eyes, She won, and Cupid blind did rise. O Love! has she done this to thee? What shall, alas! become of me?
Seite 585 - To dwellers in a wood, almost every species of tree has its voice as well as its feature. At the passing of the breeze, the fir-trees sob and moan no less distinctly than they rock ; the holly whistles as it battles with itself ; the ash hisses amid its quiverings ; the beech rustles while its flat boughs rise and fall.
Seite 183 - The commanding general considers that no greater disgrace could befall the army, and through it, our whole people, than the perpetration of the barbarous outrages upon the...
Seite 141 - ... outlived. The elder he grows, he is a stair lower from God; and, like his first father, much worse in his breeches. He is the Christian's example, and the old man's relapse; the one imitates his pureness, and the other falls into his simplicity. Could he put off his body with his little coat, he had got eternity without a burden, and exchanged but one heaven for another.

Bibliografische Informationen