The Poetry of Architecture: Cottage, Villa, Etc

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J. Wiley & sons, 1873 - 246 Seiten
 

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Seite 184 - And the Naiad-like lily of the vale, Whom youth makes so fair, and passion so pale, 'fhat the light of its tremulous bells is seen Through their pavilions of tender green ; 7.
Seite 228 - I can give not what men call love, But wilt thou accept not The worship the heart lifts above And the Heavens reject not, The desire of the moth for the star, Of the night for the morrow, The devotion to something afar From the sphere of our sorrow...
Seite 81 - We have contemplated the rural dwelling of the peasant ; let us next consider the ruralised domicile of the gentleman : and here, as before, we shall first determine what is theoretically beautiful, and then observe how far our expectations are fulfilled in individual buildings. But a few preliminary observations are necessary. Man, the peasant, is a being of more marked national character, than man, the educated and refined.
Seite 184 - And the Naiad-like lily of the vale, . . ' Whom youth makes so fair and passion so pale, That the light of its tremulous bells is seen Through their pavilions of tender green...
Seite 184 - Every one who is about to lay out a limited extent of garden, in which he wishes to introduce many flowers, should read and attentively study, first Shelley, and next Shakspeare. The latter, indeed, induces the most beautiful connexions between thought and flower that can be found in the whole range of European literature ; but he very often uses the symbolical effect of the flower, which it can only...
Seite 83 - Again: man, in his hours of relaxation, when he is engaged in the pursuit of mere pleasure, is less national than when he is under the influence of any of the more violent feelings which agitate everyday life. The reason of this may at first appear somewhat obscure, but it will become evident, on a little reflection. Aristotle's definition...
Seite 119 - Now, we have defined the province of the architect to be, that of selecting such forms and colours as shall delight the mind, by preparing it for the operations to which it is to be subjected in the building. Now, no forms, in domestic architecture, can thus prepare it more distinctly than those which correspond closely with the first, that is, the fixed and fundamental part of character, which is always so uniform in its action as to induce great simplicity in whatever it designs. Nothing, on the...

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