The pilgrim's progress from this world, to that which is to come. Repr. [in facs.].

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Seite 3 - I dreamed, and behold, I saw a man clothed with rags, standing in a certain place, with his face from his own house, a book in his hand, and a great burden upon his back. I looked, and saw him open the book, and read therein; and, as he read, he wept, and trembled; and, not being able longer to contain, he brake out with a lamentable cry, saying, What shall I do?
Seite 164 - The sword of him that layeth at him cannot hold, the spear, the dart, nor the habergeon. He esteemeth iron as straw, and brass as rotten wood. The arrow cannot make him flee, sling-stones are turned with him into stubble. Darts are counted as stubble : he laugheth at the shaking of a spear.
Seite 141 - You have this night trespassed on me by trampling in and lying on my grounds, and therefore you must go along with me. So they were forced to go, because he was stronger than they. They also had but little to say, for they knew themselves in a fault.
Seite 107 - Then I saw in my dream, that when they were got out of the wilderness, they presently saw a town before them, and the name of that town is Vanity ; and at the town there is a fair kept, called Vanity Fair : it is kept all the year long ; it beareth the name of Vanity Fair, because the town where it is kept is lighter than vanity ; and also because all that is there sold, or that cometh thither, is vanity. As is the saying of the wise,
Seite 3 - THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS IN THE SIMILITUDE OF A DREAM. The Jail. •-; SI walked through the wilderness of this world, I lighted on a certain place .where was a den, and laid me down in that place to sleep ; and, as I slept, I dreamed a dream.
Seite 145 - Well, towards evening the giant goes down into the dungeon again, to see if his prisoners had taken his counsel : but when he came there he found them alive ; and, truly, alive was all ; for now, what for want of bread and water, and by reason of the wounds they received when he beat them, they could do little but breathe.
Seite 145 - ... may lose the use of his limbs ? And if ever that should come to pass again, for my part, I am resolved to pluck up the heart of a man, and to try my utmost to get from under his hand.
Seite 107 - City as these two honest persons are: and Beelzebub, Apollyon, and Legion, with their companions, perceiving by the path that the pilgrims made, that their way to the city lay through this town of Vanity, they contrived here to set up a fair; a fair wherein should be sold...
Seite 197 - is the Mount Sion, the heavenly Jerusalem, the innumerable company of angels, and the spirits of just men made perfect.

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