George Morland: His Life and Works

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G. Bell, 1907 - 199 Seiten
 

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Seite 16 - ... room. If he wished to introduce a red cloak, or any other garment of that sort, he would place a person at the Window to watch till some one passed that appeared likely to suit his purpose ; on which he sent for the passenger to come in, while he made a sketch, and mixed his tints, and he seldom failed to reward the person thus called upon liberally. What he could not copy immediately from nature, was supplied by a retentive meJnory, and acute observation of the scenes in which he mingled.
Seite 16 - He would get one to stand or sit for a hand, another for a head, an attitude, or a figure, according as their countenance or character suited. In this manner he painted some of his best pictures, while his companions were regaling on gin and red herrings around him. Morland never let slip an opportunity which he could turn to his professional advantage. Just as he was about to begin his four pictures of the Deserter...
Seite 118 - Morlan • ing popularity ; obliging dealers aiding, he coined himself into guineas, and so, like the reckless and passionate unthrift he was, he flung away his genius and his life in handfuls, till nothing good was left him but the silence and the decency of death. In all the range of British art there are few things better than a good Morland. It has been complained of him that his tastes were
Seite 16 - Then the drums beat and we started : 'twas a four mile heat and the first three miles I could not keep the horse behind them, being so spirited an animal ; by that means he soon exhausted himself and I soon had the mortification to see them come galloping past me hissing and laughing, whilst I was spurring his guts out.
Seite 16 - ... Margate races, and was very near being killed : I rode for a gentleman and won the heat so completely, that when I came into the starting-post, the other horses were near half a mile behind me, upon which near four hundred sailors, smugglers, fishermen, etc., set upon me with sticks, stones, waggoner's whips, fists, etc., and one man, an innkeeper here, took me by the thigh and pulled me off" the horse : I could not defend myself : the sounds I heard all where ; Kill him ! Strip him ! Throw him...
Seite 90 - ... drawing-room, at work, or rather drinking and talking over his old disasters. It was with heartfelt concern the author perceived, that his friend had re-commenced his pernicious draughts ; and the havoc it seemed to have made in his intellects, was only equalled by the evident decay of his .constitution. He looked besotted and squalid ; cadaverous hanging cheeks, a pinched nose, contracted nostrils, bleared and bloodshot eyes, a bloated frame, swelled legs, a palsied hand, and a tremulous voice...
Seite 16 - I have commenced a new business of jockey to the races. I was sent for to Mount Pleasant, by a gentleman of the Turf, to ride a race for the Silver Cup, as I am thought to be the best horseman here. I went there and was weighed, and was afterwards dressed in a tight striped jacket and jockey's cap, and lifted on the horse, led to the start, placed in the rank and file ; three parts of the people out of four laid great bets that I should win the cup, etc. Then the drums beat, and we started ; 'twas...
Seite 5 - ... most completely. She had three sons and two daughters ; her partiality was to her son George and his youngest sister Sophia. . . . The elder sister was a most exemplary character " [afterwards James Ward's sisterin-law], " and the more praiseworthy as being brought up under the greatest temptations to the contrary. One son went to sea. He returned to England once, after which he went to sea again and was never afterwards heard of. The other brother Henry was a dealer in everything, a business...
Seite 16 - ... inquiries on the different modes of recruiting, with every particular attendant on the trial of deserters by courtmartial, and on their punishment. He then took them to his house, where he gave them plenty of ale, wine, and tobacco, and caroused with them all night, employing himself busily in sketching and noting down whatever was likely to serve his purpose. Nature was the grand source from which Morland drew all his images. He was fearful of becoming a mannerist : with other artists he never...
Seite 16 - ... long before I could mount. After I was mounted and got to some distance, I missed my hat ; at last I saw a man waving a hat at me ; I rode to him, and found it to be a person I knew very well. He found means to get it to me whilst two sailors were fighting who should have it.

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