Civil Service in Great Britain: A History of Abuses and Reforms and Their Bearing Upon American Politics

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Harper & Brothers, 1880 - 469 Seiten
 

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Seite 46 - Majesty, that no man hereafter be compelled to make or yield any gift, loan, benevolence, tax, or such like charge, without common consent by act of parliament...
Seite 72 - The invariable rule in appointments should have reference to the honesty, fidelity and capacity of the appointees, giving to the party in power those places where harmony and vigor of administration require its policy to be represented, but permitting all others to be filled by persons selected with sole reference to the efficiency of the public service, and the right of all citizens to share in the honor of rendering faithful service to the country.
Seite 44 - That as to dispute what God may do is blasphemy, ... so is it sedition in subjects to dispute what a king may do in the height of his power.
Seite 67 - Judges' Commissions be made Quamdiu se bene gesserint, and their salaries ascertained and established ; but upon the Address of both Houses of Parliament it may be lawful to remove them.
Seite 260 - ... such persons only as have just claims on the royal beneficence, or who, by their personal services to the crown, by the performance of duties to the public, or by their useful discoveries in science, and attainments in literature and the arts, have merited the gracious consideration of their Sovereign, and the gratitude of their country.
Seite 177 - Admission into the Civil Service is indeed eagerly sought after, but it is for the unambitious, and the indolent or incapable, that it is chiefly desired. Those whose abilities do not warrant an expectation that they will succeed in the open professions, where they must encounter the competition of their contemporaries, and those whom indolence of temperament or physical...
Seite 121 - ... searcher, or other officer or person whatsoever concerned or employed in the charging, collecting, levying, or managing the customs...
Seite 274 - If they are not excluded they become the executive, they eclipse the President himself. A legislative chamber is greedy and covetous; it acquires as much, it concedes as little as possible. The passions of its members are its rulers; the lawmaking faculty, the most comprehensive of the imperial faculties, is its instrument; it will TAKE the administration if it can take it. Tried by their own aims, the founders of the United States were wise in excluding the ministers from Congress.
Seite xvi - ... a primary object of such a national institution should be the education of our youth in the science of government. In a republic what species of knowledge can be equally important and what duty more pressing on its legislature than to patronize a plan for communicating it to those who are to be the future guardians of the liberties of the country?
Seite 37 - ... the king became the head of the Church as well as of the State, and...

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