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break or wound those which are young and fresh. Water them gently when newly planted, place them in the shade for three weeks, and if the weather is hot and dry, water them in a similar manner once or twice a week. Most of the species may at this time be increased by offsets, which should be planted in very small pots; and if, in taking off the suckers, you find them very moist where they are broken from the mother-root, they should lie in a dry shady place for a week before they are planted. When planted, treat them like the old plants. Such kinds as do not afford plenty of offsets may generally be propagated by taking off some of the under leaves, laying them to dry for ten days or a fortnight, and planting them, putting that part of the leaf which adhered to the old plant about an inch or an inch and a half into the earth. This should be done in June.

There are few things, I believe, more venerable, more eloquently impressive in their antiquity, than an old tree. The ruins of an old and noble edifice, of which every shat- , tered fragment, every gaping cranny, complains of the destructive hand of time, is young and modern in our eyes, compared with that which still survives its touch,—the old ivy, that still, with every succeeding year, moves slowly on, knitting its creeping stalks into every crevice, and carrying its broad leaves

up
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summit. What can be more venerable than the far-spreading roots of an old elm or oak tree, veining the earth with wood! Cross but that little piece of wood, called the wilderness, leading from Hampstead towards North End, where the intermingled roots are visible at every step, casing the earth in impenetrable armour, and forming a natural pavement, apparently as old as time itself-can all the antiquities of Egypt command a greater reverence?

The larger species of Aloe, from the immensity of its

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superstitious Egyptians believe that this plant hinders evil spirits and apparitions from entering the house; and on this account, whoever walks the streets in Cairo, will find it over the doors of both Christians and Jews.

“ The leaves of the different specimens of Aloe, as well as the Agave, are highly serviceable to the natives of the countries where they grow. The negroes in Senegal make excellent ropes of them, which are not liable to rot in water; and of two kinds mentioned by Sir Hans Sloane, one is manufactured into fishing-lines, bow-strings, stockings, and hammocks; while the other has leaves, which, like those of the wild pine and the banana, hold rainwater, and thus afford a valuable refreshment to travellers in hot climates. The poor in Mexico derive almost every necessary of life from a species of Aloe. Besides making excellent hedges for their fields, its trunk serves instead of beams for the roofs of their houses, and its leaves supply the place of tiles. From these they obtain paper, thread, needles, clothing, shoes, stockings, and cordage; from the juice they make wine, honey, sugar, and vinegar.”

Such of the Aloes as do not require a stove will bear the open air, in our climate, from the end of March to the end of September. During the winter they should be watered about once in a month; in the summer, when the weather is dry, once in a week or ten days; but when there is much rain, they should be sheltered from it, or they will be apt to rot. If the weather be mild, they may be placed where they may receive the fresh air in the day-time for a month after they are housed; after that the windows should be closed. They should not be put into large pots, but should be removed into fresh earth every year, which should be done in July. As much of the earth should be shaken away as possible, the roots opened with the fingers, and such as are decayed taken off; but great care“ must be taken not to

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break or wound those which are young and fresh. Water them gently when newly planted, place them in the shade for three weeks, and if the weather is hot and dry, water them in a similar manner once or twice a week. Most of the species may at this time be increased by offsets, which should be planted in very small pots; and if, in taking off the suckers, you find them very moist where they are broken from the mother-root, they should lie in a dry shady place for a week before they are planted. When planted, treat them like the old plants. Such kinds as do not afford plenty of offsets may generally be propagated by taking off some of the under leaves, laying them to dry for ten days or a fortnight, and planting them, putting that part of the leaf which adhered to the old plant about an inch or an inch and a half into the earth. This should be done in June.

There are few things, I believe, more venerable, more eloquently impressive in their antiquity, than an old tree. The ruins of an old and noble edifice, of which every shattered fragment, every gaping cranny, complains of the destructive hand of time, is young and modern in our eyes, compared with that which still survives its touch,—the old ivy, that still, with every succeeding year, moves slowly on, knitting its creeping stalks into every crevice, and carrying its broad leaves up to the very summit. What can be more venerable than the far-spreading roots of an old elm or oak tree, veining the earth with wood! Cross but that little piece of wood, called the wilderness, leading from Hampstead towards North End, where the intermingled roots are visible at every step, casing the earth in impenetrable armour, and forming a natural pavement, apparently as old as time itself—can all the antiquities of Egypt command a greater reverence?

The larger species of Aloe, from the immensity of its

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size, and the known slowness of its growth, must speak the same impressive language. Mr. Campbell has put it in a noble attitude for the occasion:

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" Rocks sublime
To human art a sportive semblance bore,
And yellow lichens colour'd all the clime
Like moonlight battlements, and towers decay'd by time.
But high in amphitheatre above,
His arms the everlasting aloes threw.”

GERTRUDE OF WYOMING.

The Abbé la Pluche gives an interesting account of the uses of the Chinese Aloe, commonly called Wood-aloes, or Aloes-wood; from whence, as has been supposed, the name of aloe has been transferred to the common species.

“ This Aloe,” says he, " is as tall as the olive-tree, and of much the same shape: there are three sorts of wood contained under its bark; the first is black, compact, and heavy; the second swarthy, and as light as touchwood; the third, which lies near the heart, diffuses a powerful fragrance. The first is known by the name of eagle-wood, and is a scarce commodity; the second, calembouc-wood, which is transported into Europe, where it is highly esteemed as an excellent drug; it burns like wax, and, when thrown into the fire, has an aromatic odour. The third, which is the heart, and called calambac, or tambac wood, is a more valuable commodity in the Indies than gold itself. It is used for perfuming the clothes and the apartments of persons of distinction; and is a specific medicine for persons affected with fainting-fits, or with the palsy. The Indians, likewise, set their most costly jewels in this wood. The leaves of this tree are sometimes used instead of slates for roofing houses; are manufactured into dishes and plates, and, when well dried, are fit to be brought to table. If stripped betimes of their nerves and fibres, they are used as hemp, and manufactured into a thread. Of the points, with which the branches abound, are made nails, darts, and awls. The Indians pierce holes in their ears with the last, when they propose to honour the devil with some peculiar testimonies of their devotion. If any orifice or aperture be made in this tree by cutting off any of its buds, a sweet vinous liquor effuses in abundance from the wound, which proves an agreeable liquor to drink when fresh, and in process of time becomes an excellent vinegar. The wood of the branches is very agreeable to the taste, and has something of the flavour of a candied citron. The roots themselves are of service, and are frequently converted into ropes. To conclude, a whole family may subsist on, reside in, and be decently clothed by, one of these Aloes.”

The common writing-paper in Cochin-China is made from the bark of this tree; of which the botanical name is aquilaria, from aquila, an eagle, so named because it grows in lofty places; and from its bitter taste, also termed Woodaloes.

Chaucer notices both the fragrance and the bitterness of the Aloe-wood:

« The woful teris that thei letin fal
As bittir werin, out of teris kinde,
For paine, as is ligne aloes, or gal.”

TROILUS AND CRESEIDE, book iv.

“ My chambir is strowed with mirre and insence,
With sote savoring aloes and sinnamone,
Brething an aromatike redolence.”

REMEDIE OF LOVE.

The great antiquity of the use of Wood-aloe as a perfume is shown by the Bible: “ All thy garments," says a passage in the Psalms, “ smell of myrrh, and aloes, and cassia :"

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