Artificial and Compulsory Drinking Usages of the United Kingdom

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Houlston and Stoneman, 1844 - 257 Seiten
 

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Seite 237 - Sing, O ye heavens; for the Lord hath done it: shout, ye lower parts of the earth: break forth into singing, ye mountains, O forest, and every tree therein: for the Lord hath redeemed Jacob, and glorified himself in Israel.
Seite 237 - And such as do wickedly against the covenant shall, he corrupt by flatteries ; but the people that do know their God shall be strong, and do exploits.
Seite 67 - And they hae taen his very heart's blood, And drank it round and round; And still the more and more they drank, Their joy did more abound. John Barleycorn was a hero bold, Of noble enterprise ; For if you do but taste his blood, Twill make your courage rise. 'Twill make a man forget his woe; 'Twill heighten all his joy : 'Twill make the widow's heart to sing, Tho
Seite 62 - But bring a Scotsman frae his hill, Clap in his cheek a Highland gill, Say, such is royal George's will, An' there's the foe, He has nae thought but how to kill Twa at a blow. Nae cauld, faint-hearted doubtings tease him: Death comes, wi' fearless eye he sees him; Wi' bluidy hand a welcome gies him : An' when he fa's, His latest draught o' breathin lea'es him In faint huzzas.
Seite 65 - An' now, auld Cloots, I ken ye're thinkin, A certain Bardie's rantin, drinkin, Some luckless hour will send him Hnkin, To your black pit ; But, faith ! he'll turn a corner jinkin, An' cheat you yet. But, fare you weel, auld Nickie-ben I O wad ye tak a thought an...
Seite 196 - Who is David? and who is the son of Jesse? there be many servants now a days that break away every man from his master. Shall I then take my bread, and my water, and my flesh that I have killed for my shearers, and give it unto men, whom I know not whence they be?
Seite 63 - Leeze me on Drink ! it gies us mair Than either School or College : It kindles wit, it waukens lair, It pangs us fou o' knowledge. Be't whisky gill, or penny wheep, Or ony stronger potion, It never fails, on drinking deep, To kittle up our notion By night or day, XX. The lads an' lasses, blythely bent To mind baith saul an' body, Sit round the table, weel content, An' steer about the toddy. On this ane's dress, an...
Seite 171 - ... high, which is the sole dwelling of the schoolmaster, his wife, and six children. The unwholesome condition of the air under these circumstances may be easily conceived. The mode of payment to the teacher of this school is remarkable and characteristic. A kind of club, which does not consist exclusively of the parents of the scholars, meets every Saturday evening at a public-house ; when, after some hours spent in drinking and smoking, a subscription is raised, and handed over to the schoolmaster,...
Seite 154 - The punishment generally consists in the criminal providing a libation, by which the offending workmen may wash away the stain that his misconduct has laid upon the body at large. Should the plaintiff not be able to substantiate his charge, the fine then falls upon himself for having maliciously arraigned his companion ; a mode of practice which is marked with the features of sound policy, as it never loses sight of the good of the chapel.
Seite 154 - ... the first intimation of which he makes to the Father of the Chapel, usually the oldest printer in the house, who, should he conceive that the charge can be substantiated, and the injury supposed to have been received is of such magnitude as to call for the interference of the law, summonses the members of the Chapel before him at the imposing- stone, and there receives the allegations and the defence in solemn assembly, and dispenses justice with typographical rigour and impartiality.

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